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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Peace Game Puts 'Weight Of The World' On Students

Dec 25, 2011

John Hunter's fourth-graders are remarkably successful at resolving world crises peacefully.

Hunter, 57, has been teaching for more than three decades. He wanted to get his students to think about major world issues, so he invented the World Peace Game. Students are divided into countries, and then given a series of global crises — natural disasters, political conflicts — that they have to solve.

"Sometimes World Peace Game feels like, you know, the weight of the world on your shoulders: This is exploding over here, this is firing over there, this is spilling oil," 11-year-old Julianne Swope tells Hunter. "And I just look at the board and ... I say to myself, 'Oh my gosh, I need to fix this.' "

The former World Peace Game player says Hunter always told his class: "Know the consequences."

She says that principle should be applied in life as well.

Hunter says he hopes the game teaches students "how to make people not suffer so much."

"I think I now hope the game also helps people be more compassionate and kinder," he says.

Julianne says she has learned that lesson.

"That no matter where you're from, your background, you can still connect with someone else that you've never even met before," she says.

Irene Newman played the Hunter's game 10 years ago. She's now studying peace, war and defense at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

"[In] third grade I thought I was going to be president of the United States," she tells Hunter.

Hunter remembers her pigtails, glasses and Brownie uniform.

"You were an intellectual, a third-grade intellectual," he says.

Newman was determined to win the game, and she thought her strategy would be to take everything over.

"I started on that path and quickly ran into a lot of problems," she says. "I really began to understand as we were playing the game, we found peace more through cooperation with one another."

On her 13th birthday, Newman received two pages of advice from Hunter. No. 22 on the list: "Most problems are actually pretty simple to solve. We superimpose so much on them that they become so complex."

That bit of advice, for Newman, makes her think that if elementary school children can solve certain issues, then maybe world problems are simpler than we make them out to be.

"Our world could be in a different situation than it is now," she says, if third- and fourth-graders were in charge.

"I'm almost afraid adults are playing the real world peace game, and we're not doing so well at it," Hunter says, "but third-graders and fourth-graders routinely fix everything and make everything world OK.

"If just one of them gets through — 10 years, 15 years later — they may save us all."

He's hoping Newman will be in that position one day.

Hunter is currently playing the game with fourth-graders at Agnor-Hurt Elementary School in Charlottesville, Va.

Audio Produced for Weekend Edition Sunday by Brian Reed and Katie Simon.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.