Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Pages

'Obamacare' Sounds Different When Supporters Say It

Mar 31, 2012
Originally published on March 31, 2012 3:21 pm

Until recently, "Obamacare" was a word mostly used by opponents of President Obama's health care law. Now, supporters of the law are attempting to claim it as their own.

During the three days of health care hearings, protesters outside of the Supreme Court in favor of the law returned to one chant more than any other: "We love Obamacare."

The phrase was not somebody's impromptu brainstorm on the steps of the Supreme Court. People carried mass-printed black-and-yellow signs that said it in big, bold letters.

"My daughter was a 24-year-old who was without health care, was put back on my plan, and luckily she did because she tore her ACL playing soccer and needed surgery, so she was covered for her insurance," says Alan Perigoy, who was handing out granola bars. "So I'm happy to have the Obamacare. That's why I'm here supporting it."

He says his use of the word "Obamacare" is "very appropriate."

"Well, Obama does care, as he said recently," he says. "It's not pejorative at all. It's a wonderful thing."

A GOP Tag Line

It sure was pejorative for a while. During the 2009 health care debate in Congress, the word was almost exclusively used by Republicans. Obamacare became shorthand for big, bad government. By 2010, the word was all over Republican TV ads.

This year on the Republican presidential campaign, Mitt Romney and the other candidates have learned that one of the biggest applause lines in any stump speech is: "If I'm president, I'm going to get rid of Obamacare on Day 1."

The term echoes "Hillarycare," the word Republicans used to describe the Clinton health care plan in the early '90s.

It doesn't help Democrats that this law's real name is a mouthful. "The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act" doesn't exactly roll off the tongue.

Early on, the White House didn't want to adopt the word Obamacare. It was trying to win over Republicans. The message was that universal health care is bigger than one man.

But over time it became clear: The word was not going away. At a speech in Atlanta earlier this month, Obama embraced it.

"You want to call it Obamacare? That's OK, because I do care," he said. "That's why we passed it."

He made a similar point all the way back in August: "If the other side wants to be the folks who don't care, that's fine with me," he said.

On the second anniversary of the law last week, the Obama re-election campaign set up a webpage that says, "I Like Obamacare." It is selling buttons, T-shirts and bumper stickers with that message.

Turning Terms Around

Linguist Ben Zimmer, executive producer of Visual Thesaurus and Vocabulary.com, says there's a long history of groups trying to reclaim negative words.

"So for instance, the term 'queer,' which is a very pejorative term, in fact was reclaimed by members of the gay community as a neutral or positive term," he says, "to the extent that now you have queer studies at universities, for instance."

In politics, he says, whether a term is positive or negative often hinges on outside events.

"During Ronald Reagan's first term, 'Reaganomics' was generally a negative epithet," he says, "but by 1984, the economy had turned around, and Ronald Reagan in fact embraced the term 'Reaganomics.' "

So whether "Obamacare" has a bright future or not may depend less on the people shouting the word on the Supreme Court steps and more on the folks deliberating inside that white marble building.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

During those three days of hearings at the U.S. Supreme Court this week, protesters marching outside in favor of the health care law returned to one chant more than another other.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTESTERS CHANTING)

PROTESTORS: We love Obamacare. We love Obamacare.

SIMON: We love Obamacare. Now, until recently Obamacare was a word mostly used by the law's opponents. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on the efforts by supporters of the president's law to claim it as their own.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: We love Obamacare was not somebody's impromptu brainstorm on the steps of the Supreme Court. People carried mass-printed black-and-yellow signs that said it in big, bold letters. Talking to any supporters in the crowd, these were often among the first words you would hear.

ALAN PERIGOY: Well, I love Obamacare.

SHAPIRO: Alan Perigoy was handing out granola bars to the marchers.

PERIGOY: My daughter was a 24-year-old who was without health care, was put back on my plan, and luckily she did because she tore her ACL playing soccer and needed surgery. So she was covered for her insurance. So I'm happy to have the Obamacare, and that's why I'm here supporting it.

SHAPIRO: I notice you use the word Obamacare. It seems as though a lot of supporters are trying to reclaim that from the law's opponents. Do you get that sense?

PERIGOY: Well, Obama does care, as he said recently, and so Obamacare is very appropriate. It's not pejorative at all. It's a wonderful thing.

SHAPIRO: It sure was pejorative for a while. During the 2009 health care debate in Congress, the word was almost exclusively used by Republicans. Obamacare became shorthand for big, bad government. By 2010, the word was all over Republican TV ads.

(SOUNDBITES OF TV ADS)

UNKNOWN WOMAN #1: Leading the fight to stop Obamacare in Texas.

UNKNOWN MAN #1: Obamacare will cost taxpayers trillions.

UNKNOWN MAN #2: Even voted for Obamacare.

SHAPIRO: And if you're on the Republican presidential campaign, Mitt Romney and the other candidates have learned that one of the biggest applause lines in any stump speech is...

MITT ROMNEY: Well, if I'm president, I'm gonna get rid of Obamacare on day one.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SHAPIRO: The term echoes Hillarycare, the word Republicans used to describe the Clinton health care plan in the early '90s. It doesn't help Democrats that this law's real name is a mouthful. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. Early on, the White House didn't want to adopt the word Obamacare. They were trying to win over Republicans, and their message was that universal health care is bigger than one man.

But over time it became clear - the word was not going away. So at a speech in Atlanta earlier this month, President Obama embraced it.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: You want to call it Obamacare, that's OK 'cause I do care.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

OBAMA: That's why we passed it.

SHAPIRO: He made a similar point all the way back in August.

OBAMA: If the other side wants to be the folks who don't care, that's fine with me.

SHAPIRO: On the second anniversary of the law last week, the Obama re-election campaign set up a webpage that says I Like Obamacare. They're selling buttons, T-shirts, and bumper stickers with that message. The question is whether they can connect the word not just with the president, but with the promise of affordable health care for everyone.

Linguist Ben Zimmer says there's a long history of groups trying to reclaim negative words. He's executive producer of the "Visual Thesaurus" and the Vocabulary.com.

BEN ZIMMER: So for instance, the term queer, which is a very pejorative term, in fact was reclaimed by members of the gay community as a neutral or positive term, to the extent that now you have queer studies at universities, for instance.

SHAPIRO: In politics, he says, whether a term is positive or negative often hinges on outside events.

ZIMMER: During Ronald Reagan's first term, Reaganomics was generally a negative epithet, but by 1984, the economy had turned around, and Ronald Reagan in fact embraced the term Reaganomics.

SHAPIRO: So whether Obamacare has a bright future or not may depend less on the people shouting the word on the Supreme Court steps, and more on the folks deliberating inside that white marble building.

Ari Shapiro, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.