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The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

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"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

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Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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Obama Neutralizes A Typical Source Of GOP Strength

Sep 6, 2012
Originally published on September 6, 2012 4:59 pm

Foreign policy and defense matters are normally a source of vulnerability for Democrats, but they're getting a fair amount of attention from speakers down in Charlotte.

"There are more mentions of Osama bin Laden than unemployment in the Democratic national platform," says Micah Zenko, a fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations. "You play to what your strengths are."

Democrats are mostly talking about domestic issues at their convention this week, but some speakers are addressing national security and veterans' issues. On today's undercard is Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, who chairs the Foreign Relations Committee and was the party's 2004 nominee.

Republicans spoke little about national security at their convention last week in Tampa, Fla. In fact, GOP nominee Mitt Romney quickly drew criticism from Democrats for not mentioning Afghanistan in his acceptance speech.

Obama campaign aides have said the president will talk about the war during his acceptance speech tonight. He also is expected to speak to his broader agenda with regard to the rest of the world.

Obama has made good on his 2008 campaign promise to end the war in Iraq, but has shown himself to be assertive through the heavy use of drone strikes and the bombing campaign that helped bring down Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

GOP analysts say Romney didn't devote much attention to foreign policy issues simply because voters aren't all that interested. Public opinion polls consistently show that only a handful of voters consider national security one of their top concerns.

"The American people are not focused first or foremost, or 10th or 10th-most, on foreign policy," says Danielle Pletka, vice president for defense and foreign policy studies at the conservative American Enterprise Institute.

Pletka says Obama is, in fact, vulnerable on foreign policy questions. Romney has criticized the president for offering more apologies than leadership, and has pledged to take a tougher stance toward countries such as China, Russia and Iran.

Romney also says Obama has not been a reliable friend to Israel, so Republicans are certain to seize on the Democratic platform fight over continuing to recognize Jerusalem as its capital.

"If Democrats think that they can run on that foreign policy record and get a lot of additional votes on that record, I think that's just delusional," says James Jay Carafano, director of the foreign policy center at the conservative Heritage Foundation.

Democrats say although Romney has talked tough, his actual differences with the president on national security are fairly minimal. They doubt he'll be able to make good on his intentions to boost defense spending significantly, and think his rhetoric belies the choices he'd make once in office.

"When you look at the fine details, which people like me have the luxury of being paid to do, Romney doesn't offer a clear policy alternative," says Brian Katulis, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank.

After Obama took office, his foreign policy in general represented much less of a break with his predecessor, George W. Bush, than his campaign speeches in 2008 might have suggested.

"Obama always claims credit for ending the war in Iraq, but it was essentially the cover of a Republican administration that allowed Obama to do it," says Zenko, the Council on Foreign Relations fellow. "The only thing Obama did was implement the status of forces agreement signed by Bush."

Katulis, who wrote a column about GOP foreign policy divisions in The New York Times on Saturday, says — along with many other analysts — that Obama lacks any definable, grand strategic vision.

"If you ask, 'What is the Obama foreign policy?' — it's very hard to spot it," says Rajan Menon, a political science professor at City College of New York. "He's an issue-by-issue, pragmatic kind of guy."

That might suit voters just fine. Handling crises on the world stage is part of any president's job description, but polling suggests Americans don't want to get involved in major military interventions.

"On Syria, the president's caution mirrors that of most Americans," Menon wrote in The Huffington Post.

Obama may have neutralized most of the GOP's historic attacks on his party as weak on defense. But a period of relative quiet is one reason why foreign policy isn't likely to sway many voters in this election, one way or the other.

"If you look through history, it's never been less important, even at the end of the Cold War," Zenko says.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.