"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Obama Campaign Questions Lessons Of Romney's Business Experience

May 14, 2012
Originally published on May 15, 2012 10:10 am

President Obama's re-election campaign is attacking Mitt Romney's business experience, perhaps his strongest selling point as a candidate, in a new TV ad in five swing states.

The Romney campaign responded, in essence: Bring it on.

The two-minute ad — "Steel" — echoes questions raised early in the Republican primary about Romney's oversight of companies that Bain Capital ran when Romney was CEO of the private equity firm.

But the most direct attack at that time came from a superPAC supporting Newt Gingrich. And by law, the Gingrich campaign itself could not coordinate with the superPAC, giving him some distance from the video.

This new ad out Monday comes directly from Obama's re-election team. And it signals an aggressive effort to hit Romney at the core of the contention that his business prowess makes him better equipped to deal with a struggling economy — and, specifically, to help lower the national unemployment level — than Obama.

Bain became majority owner of GST Steel in Kansas City, Mo., in 1993. The century-old steel company declared bankruptcy in 2001.

"They made as much money off it as they could, and they closed it down," Joe Soptic, a steelworker for 30 years who ultimately lost his job, says in the ad. "They filed for bankruptcy without any concern for the families or the communities." Another former steelworker, John Wiseman, says flatly in the ad: "We view Mitt Romney as a job destroyer."

Romney spokeswoman Andrea Saul said in a statement: "We welcome the Obama campaign's attempt to pivot back to jobs and a discussion of their failed record." She also noted that GST Steel went bankrupt only after Romney had left Bain to run the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

And former Obama "auto czar" Steve Ratner called the ad "unfair," telling MSNBC's Morning Joe that Bain Capital's responsibility was "to make profits for its investors, most of whom were pension funds, endowments and foundations. And it did it superbly well, acting within the rules, acting very responsibly, and was a leading firm."

The ad, airing in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Colorado, Virginia and Iowa, hits Bain for its overall management of the steel company, including targeting employee pensions and health insurance.

The Obama campaign also launched a longer Web version of the ad. And it unveiled a new website attacking Romney's economic policies.

UPDATED 4:25 p.m. ET

Monday afternoon, the Romney campaign released its own Web ad showing a different outcome for steelworkers from a different company, one that clearly benefited from its affiliation with Bain.

The ad focuses on the success of Indiana company Steel Dynamics.

As the Los Angeles Times noted in January, Steel Dynamics has been cited before by Romney as a Bain success story. But the full story complicates things a bit for Romney and his calls for less government in the business arena.

The Los Angeles Times reported:

"What Romney doesn't mention is that Steel Dynamics also received generous tax breaks and other subsidies provided by the state of Indiana and the residents of DeKalb County, where the company's first mill was built."

"The story of Bain and Steel Dynamics illustrates how Romney, during his business career, made avid use of public-private partnerships, something that many conservatives consider to be 'corporate welfare.' It is a commitment that carried over into his term as governor of Massachusetts, when he offered similar incentives to lure businesses to his state."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.