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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

19 minutes ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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New York City Hits A New Population Mark, Topping 8.3 Million

Mar 14, 2013

New York City's population is at an all-time high, with an estimated 8,336,697 people living in the city, according to the most recent U.S. Census Data. "For the first time since before 1950, more people are coming to New York City than leaving," said Mayor Bloomberg, announcing the gains Thursday.

In the period from April 2010 to July 2012, the city gained 161,564 residents, according to the Census Bureau's estimates. All five of New York's boroughs saw growth. Here's how it breaks down:

  • Brooklyn: 2.4 percent (60,900 people)
  • Manhattan: 2.1 percent (33,200 people)
  • Queens: 1.9 percent (42,000 people)
  • The Bronx: 1.7 percent (23,400 people)
  • Staten Island: 0.4 percent (2,000 people)

Announcing the growth Thursday, Mayor Bloomberg gave credit to low crime rates and high life expectancy and graduation rates, as well as job prospects that draw new arrivals.

"New York City's the magnet," Bloomberg said in a Newscast report filed by NPR's Jamie McIntyre. "People want to come here."

The Census Bureau says its data from on July 1, 2012, shows New York remaining the nation's most populous metro area, with an estimated 19.8 million residents, followed by Los Angeles and Chicago.

"All in all, nine metro areas had populations of 5 million people or more, while 52 had at least 1 million," according to the Census website.

Citing Brookings Institution demographer William H. Frey, The New York Times reports that the New York region "drew 123,000 foreign immigrants since 2011, more than metropolitan Los Angeles and Miami combined."

Mayor Bloomberg's Department of City Planning notes that while the 2010 numbers may have been artificially low due to reporting problems, those issues did not affect the 2012 findings.

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