"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Most Small Businesses Don't Quite Fit The Political Picture

Apr 18, 2012
Originally published on April 18, 2012 6:28 pm

The House is scheduled to vote Thursday on a GOP measure to cut taxes on small businesses.

Now, the mental image most of us have of a small business is probably something like this: a handful of employees, a shop, maybe a restaurant or a little tech firm.

It turns out the reality of the nation's 28 million small businesses is, in many cases, quite different.

House Republicans say their tax cut would help millions of small businesses.

"This is a bill which will directly help small businesses create jobs," says Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., the majority leader and author of the bill.

The total cost of the one-year measure is $46 billion. An analysis commissioned by a pro-GOP outside group and now posted on Cantor's website says if the tax cut only lasts for one year, it will create 40,000 jobs. Some quick back-of-the-envelope math puts that at more than $1 million per job.

NPR asked House Speaker John Boehner whether that was cost-effective.

"I think we expect it will create far more jobs than that," says the Ohio Republican. "But listen, small businesses who file as individuals, as I did in my business, face enormous challenges. And rather than pay these taxes, that money could stay in their business to help them buy more equipment, hire more workers and expand their business."

But Seattle small-business owner Makini Howell says the bill wouldn't help her at all.

Well, technically, the tax cut might help her a little. With her family, Howell owns a minimart, a vegan sandwich wholesale business, and a small group of vegan restaurants. All told, Howell has about 30 employees.

"It was great to open up and to be able to create like 25 more jobs than were there and to become a viable part of the neighborhood that we're in," she says. "That was awesome."

Less awesome are the company's profits at the end of the year, because its margins are thin and so much gets poured back into the business.

"The reality is, you make $25,000, $35,000," she says. "My income has decreased steadily since I became a small-business owner."

Under the bill from House Republicans, small-business owners — those with fewer than 500 employees — would be able to deduct 20 percent from their business income, with some exceptions. For Howell, the tax savings would work out to a few hundred bucks.

"For a business like mine, if you just do the math, it's not going to help," she says.

It's not like she'd turn down the extra cash, but it certainly wouldn't be enough to hire anyone else or to make a major equipment purchase.

Much larger firms and much more profitable companies would get most of the tax benefit, says Joe Rosenberg of the Tax Policy Center. "Your typical small business — what we might think of as your mom and pop store — is probably not going to see much benefit from this tax provision," Rosenberg says. "The largest benefits go to larger businesses that report a lot of income."

Although the image of a small-business owner is someone like Howell, under the Small Business Administration definition used by the House bill, a business with 499 employees could also be considered small.

Some 99.9 percent of the businesses in the country are small by this definition. And according to SBA data, the vast majority of them — more than 20 million firms — don't employ a single person, other than the owner.

Angela Caragan is the owner of A Cupcake Co. in Northern California. She's also the chief pastry chef, marketing director — the whole thing. Last year, she made less than $1,000 baking gourmet cupcakes. But for her, it's not really about the money.

"It's my way of sharing a little bit of smile and happiness with someone on their special day," Caragan says.

Like many people who report business income on their taxes, Caragan has another job. A full-time job. She wouldn't qualify for the tax cut, because businesses are required to have employees to take advantage of it.

So the full-time freelance photographer, or consultant who works alone, would be out of luck. Although the assumption is that many of these sole proprietors would reorganize their books and add a family member to the payroll, to get in on the new tax break.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tomorrow, the House is scheduled to vote on a GOP measure to cut taxes on small businesses. But what exactly is a small business? Small suggests a handful of employees, a shop, maybe a restaurant or a little tech firm. Well, it turns out the reality of the nation's 28 million small businesses is in many cases quite different.

NPR's Tamara Keith has this look at what counts as a small business and just who would be helped by the House tax cut.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: House Republicans say their tax cut would help millions of small businesses. Eric Cantor is the majority leader and author of the bill.

REPRESENTATIVE ERIC CANTOR: This is a bill which will directly help small businesses create jobs.

KEITH: The total cost of the one-year measure is $46 billion. An analysis commissioned by a pro-GOP outside group, and now posted on Cantor's website, says if the tax cut only lasts for one year, it will create 40,000 jobs. Some quick back of the envelope math puts that at more than a million dollars per job.

NPR asked House Speaker John Boehner whether that was cost-effective.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: I think we expect it'll create far more jobs than that. But small businesses who file as individuals, as I did in my business, face enormous challenges. And rather than them paying these taxes, that money could stay in their business to help them buy more equipment, hire more workers and expand their business.

MAKINI HOWELL: Eric Cantor's bill would not help me at all.

KEITH: That's Seattle small business owner Makini Howell. Technically, the tax cut might help her a little. With her family, Howell owns a mini mart, a vegan sandwich wholesale business, and small group of vegan restaurants.

HOWELL: So we're headed upstairs to Plum. It is Monday night.

KEITH: Plum is one of Howell's restaurants. It's a bistro, serving upscale health food without any of the crunchy ambiance.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Hi, guys.

KEITH: All told, Howell has about 30 employees.

HOWELL: It was great to open up and to be able to create like 25 more jobs than were there and to become a viable part of the neighborhood that we're in. That was awesome.

KEITH: Less awesome are the company's profits at the end of the year, because their margins are thin and so much gets poured back into the business.

HOWELL: The reality is, you make 25, 35 - my income has decreased steadily since I became a small business owner.

KEITH: Under the bill from House Republicans, small business owners - businesses with fewer than 500 employees - would be able to deduct 20 percent from their business income, with some exceptions. For Howell, the tax savings would work out to a few hundred bucks.

HOWELL: I mean, for a business like mine, if you just do the math, it's not going to help.

KEITH: It's not like she'd turn down the extra cash, but it certainly wouldn't be enough to hire anyone else or to make a major equipment purchase.

Much larger firms and much more profitable companies would get most of the tax benefit, says Joe Rosenberg of the Tax Policy Center.

JOE ROSENBERG: Your typical small business, what we might think of as your mom and pop store, is probably not going to see much benefit from this tax provision. The largest benefits go to larger businesses that report a lot of income.

KEITH: Although the image of a small business owner is someone like Howell, under the Small Business Administration definition used by the House bill, a business with 499 employees could also be considered small. Some 99.9 percent of the businesses in the country are small by this definition. And according to SBA data, the vast majority of them, more than 20 million firms, don't employ a single person other than the owner.

ANGELA CARAGAN: My name is Angela Caragan and I am the owner of A Cupcake Company.

KEITH: She's also the chief pastry chef, marketing director - the whole thing. Last year, she made less than a thousand dollars baking gourmet cupcakes. But for her it's not really about the money.

CARAGAN: It's my way of sharing a little bit of smile and happiness with someone on their special day.

KEITH: Like many people who report business income on their taxes, Caragan has another job, a full-time job. She wouldn't qualify for the tax cut because businesses are required to have employees to take advantage of it. So the full-time freelance photographer or independent consultant who works alone would be out of luck, although the assumption is that many of these sole proprietors will reorganize their books and add a family member to the payroll to get in on the tax break.

Tamara Keith, NPR News, the Capitol. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.