Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Moscato Madness: The Dessert Wine's Sweet Surge

Jan 29, 2012
Originally published on January 30, 2012 4:43 pm

In the U.S., wine drinking has held its own during these hard economic times, and even grown in some unlikely corners. Moscato, for example, the Italian dessert wine, has gone from relative obscurity to the toast of the town.

Hip-hop singer Drake, in his song "Do It Now," gives it a shout-out. It's also the wine Kanye West orders for special parties. And it's the wine Real Housewife of Atlanta NeNe Leakes has just started selling under the label Miss Moscato.

Until a few years ago, the ancient Italian wine could have been described as obscure — what one wine expert called "a little backwater grape." Now the words used about the rise of moscato are "breathtaking," "phenomenal," "insane." Industry watchers say they've never seen anything like it.

Danny Brager, vice president of the alcoholic beverages division at Nielsen, says moscato madness is not just on the coasts, and it's not only in cities — it's everywhere.

According to Brager, a Nielsen analysis found moscato sales up 73 percent in the 12 months ending Jan. 7. That's on top of the 100 percent growth from 2010. It is the fastest growing varietal wine in the country.

Brager says every wine supplier is racing to get on this trend.

They're combing the world for more grapes and growing their own. It's no longer only small Italian wineries. Jugs of Barefoot moscato are sold at BJ's Wholesale Club. It's on the menu at Olive Garden.

What's up with that?

Well, it's inexpensive — generally $8 to $20 a bottle. That's a good price point in a recession.

It's low in alcohol and has a lightly sweet, fresh flavor with hints of peaches, apricots, pears, orange blossoms and rose petals. And sweet wines are selling big, especially to the under-40 crowd, who grew up imbibing sugary drinks.

Moscato is being called a gateway beverage for new wine drinkers.

Then there's the whole hip-hop, edgy thing: Drink moscato and you'll be cool like rapper Waka Flocka — which marketers pick up on (or start), and the whole thing goes round and round. It happened with Cristal champagne, Hennessy cognac and Patron tequila.

But why moscato, once a niche after-dinner wine, nice with fruit desserts? It may remain one of life's mysteries, but as hip-hop artist Ab-Soul sings: When things get hard to swallow / We need a bottle of moscato.

Bonny Wolf is the author of Talking with My Mouth Full and contributing editor of NPR's Kitchen Window.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A nice glass of wine may seem like a luxury during tough economic times, but it is possible to indulge without breaking the bank. As WEEKEND EDITION food commentator Bonny Wolf discovered, a sweet Italian wine is gaining new popularity with a little help from some big named bands.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

DRAKE: (Singing) It's a celebration, clap, clap bravo. Lobster and shrimp and a glass of moscato. For the girl...

BONNY WOLF, BYLINE: That was hip-hop singer Drake with a shout out to an Italian dessert wine? The same wine a handful of other hip-hop artists sing about. The wine Kanye West orders for special parties. The wine Real Housewife of Atlanta NeNe Leakes has just started selling under the label Miss Moscato. Until a few years ago, the ancient Italian wine moscato could have been described as obscure; what one wine expert called a little backwater grape. Now the words used about the rise of moscato are breathtaking, phenomenal, insane. Industry watchers say they've never seen anything like it. Danny Brager, VP of the alcoholic beverages division at Nielsen, says moscato madness is not just on the coasts. It's not only in cities. It's everywhere. According to Brager, a Nielsen analysis found moscato sales up 73 percent in the 12 months ending January 7. That's on top of the 100 percent growth from 2010. It is the fastest growing varietal wine in the country. Brager says every wine supplier is racing to get on this trend. They're combing the world for more grapes and growing their own. It's no longer only small Italian wineries. Jugs of Barefoot moscato are sold at BJs Wholesale Club. It's on the menu at Olive Garden. What's up with that? Well, it's inexpensive - generally $8 to $20 a bottle, good price point in a recession. It's low in alcohol and has a lightly sweet, fresh flavor with hints of peaches, apricots, pears, orange blossoms, rose petals - all nice. And sweet wines are selling big, especially to the under-40 crowd who grew up imbibing sugary drinks. Then there's the whole hip-hop, edgy thing. Drink moscato and you'll be cool like rapper Waka Flocka, which marketers pick up on - or start - and the whole thing goes round and round. It happened with Cristal champagne, Hennessy cognac and Patron tequila. But why moscato, once a niche after-dinner wine nice with fruit desserts? It may remain one of life's mysteries, but as hip-hop artist Ab-Soul sings:

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

AB-SOUL: (Singing) When things get hard to swallow, we need a bottle of moscato.

MARTIN: Bonny Wolf is the author of "Talking with My Mouth Full" and contributing editor of NPR's Kitchen Window. This is NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.