Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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The 'Morning After' Pill: How It Works And Who Uses It

Feb 6, 2012
Originally published on February 14, 2013 11:52 am

Access to emergency contraception has swirled at the center of a recent flurry of debate over insurance coverage. It's a pill women can take if their birth control fails or they forget to use it.

The most popular brand of emergency contraception is called "Plan B One-Step." You might better know it as the morning-after pill. Today, about 10 percent of sexually active women say they've used it.

Katie Wilcox, a 20-something college graduate, is a typical example of who uses it. She's working now and has a boyfriend. She's used Plan B twice. The first time she was still in college.

"We kind of got caught up in the moment," she says. "[We] woke up in the morning and decided that we needed to go get Plan B, because neither of us were ready for any sort of pregnancy."

So Wilcox and her boyfriend headed to their local pharmacy. She presented ID and was able to buy Plan B without a prescription. (The age requirement to buy Plan B is 17, despite a recent push by the Food and Drug Administration to make it more accessible.) After that, Wilcox and her boyfriend decided to use condoms. Then one broke. Again, they turned to Plan B.

"I can't even describe how important it was," she says. "It's an important option for girls at that age to have because ... things happen."

Wilcox didn't get pregnant. Emergency contraception prevents pregnancy 89 percent of the time if women take it within three days of unprotected sex. And it's very safe, causing only minor side effects, such as nausea or headache.

Dr. Katherine White says most of her patients take Plan B right away, but it can work even if they wait a lot longer. "Emergency contraception, or Plan B, can be very effective up to ... five days after the act of unprotected intercourse," says White, an obstetrician at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass.

Plan B is a synthetic dose of the hormone progesterone. It's the same hormone that's in typical birth control pills — but at a higher dose. It works primarily by stopping the ovaries from releasing an egg. No egg, no pregnancy.

But if an egg has already been released, Plan B can still prevent the egg from getting fertilized. The dosage literally slows down the movement of the egg and, at the same time, it slows down the movement of the sperm, making it unlikely the two will meet, she says.

Now, here's where things get a bit controversial. If sperm has actually succeeded in fertilizing an egg, Plan B could possibly thin the lining of the uterus so the fertilized egg won't attach and grow. Scientists have no proof that actually happens, but in theory, it could.

White points out that that's still very different than what happens with the abortion pill — which causes a miscarriage. "If a pregnancy has already started, Plan B won't do anything to stop it," she says. Most patients don't use Plan B instead of regular birth control, she says.

Megan Kavanaugh, a senior researcher at the Guttmacher Institute, found the same thing when she looked at nationwide use. She says, "Most emergency contraception users have actually only used it once" as a backup plan — the way Katie Wilcox described using it.

Emergency contraception isn't cheap. On average, it costs $50. But it can cost as much as $90. Despite the expense, this type of contraception is slowly becoming more popular among women who don't want to get pregnant.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Today in "Your Health," we'll talk about birth control.

MONTAGNE: There's been some controversy over insurance coverage, and access to what's known as emergency contraception. It's a pill women can take if their birth control fails, or if they forget to use it. NPR's Patti Neighmond has more on how it works, and who does use it.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: The most popular brand of emergency contraception is Plan B One-Step, sometimes called the morning-after pill. Katie Wilcox is a typical example of who uses it. She's in her 20s, a recent college graduate. She's working now and has a boyfriend. She used Plan B twice. The first time, she was still in college.

KATIE WILCOX: And we kind of got caught up in the moment, I guess you could say, and then woke up in the morning and decided that we needed to go get Plan B because neither of us were ready for any sort of pregnancy.

NEIGHMOND: So Wilcox and her boyfriend headed to their local pharmacy. She presented ID, and was able to buy Plan B without a prescription. The age limit for doing this is 17. After that experience, Wilcox and her boyfriend decided to use condoms. Then, one broke. Again, they turned to Plan B.

WILCOX: I can't even describe how important it was. I think it's an important option for girls at that age to have because things happen. And I think that having Plan B as sort of a back-up plan is really important.

NEIGHMOND: It worked both times. Wilcox didn't get pregnant. Emergency contraception prevents pregnancy 89 percent of the time, if women take it within three days of unprotected sex. It's safe, causing only minor side effects like nausea and headache.

DR. KATHERINE WHITE: All right. So why don't you present the next patient?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: OK. So this is...

NEIGHMOND: At Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Massachusetts, obstetrician Katherine White talks with a medical student about a new patient. White says most of her patients take Plan B the morning after unprotected sex, but it can work a lot longer.

WHITE: Emergency contraception, or Plan B, can be very effective up to 120 hours, or five days after the act of unprotected intercourse.

NEIGHMOND: Plan B is a high dose of progesterone, the same hormone that's found in birth control pills. It works in several different ways. First, it stops the ovaries from releasing an egg - no egg, no pregnancy. But if an egg has already been released, it can still prevent pregnancy.

WHITE: It can help slow the passage of an egg down into the uterus.

NEIGHMOND: It literally slows down the movement of the egg and at the same time, it slows down the movement of the sperm - making it unlikely the two will meet. But if sperm actually succeed in fertilizing an egg, this is where things get a bit controversial.

Plan B could possibly thin the lining of the uterus - the womb - so the fertilized egg won't attach to it and grow. Scientists have no proof this actually happens but in theory, it could. That's why some people are opposed to Plan B. White says the way Plan B works is still very different than what happens with the abortion pill, mifepristone.

WHITE: So if a pregnancy has already started, Plan B won't do anything to stop it.

NEIGHMOND: White says most patients don't use Plan B instead of regular birth control. Megan Kavanaugh, a senior researcher at the Guttmacher Institute, found the same thing when she looked at national trends.

MEGAN KAVANAUGH: Most emergency contraception users have actually only used it once.

NEIGHMOND: As a back-up plan, the way Katie Wilcox described it. Emergency contraception isn't cheap. It costs, on average, $50. But it can cost as much as $90. Despite the expense, this type of contraception is slowly becoming more popular among women. Today, about 10 percent of sexually active women say they've used emergency contraception.

Patti Neighmond, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.