New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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For Microsoft, Nokia's Phones Are 'Key To Everything'

Sep 3, 2013
Originally published on September 3, 2013 12:52 pm

Here's why Microsoft says its $7.2 billion deal to buy Nokia's smartphone business as well as that company's patents and services makes sense.

"It all starts with the phone," writes PCWorld, in a piece that analyzes why "the phone is key to everything."

According to the magazine:

"In its 'strategic rationale' explaining the deal, slide 15 of Microsoft's presentation makes the case that the foundation for Windows PCs begins with Windows Phone. ... 'Windows: 300M+ devices a year,' the slide notes. 'Success in phone is important to success in tablets. Success in tablets will help PCs.' "

ZDNet adds that:

"Microsoft had little choice. Nokia controlled Windows Phone distribution and the companies were so integrated they might as well be one unit. With Nokia, Microsoft can now put Windows Phone on low-end devices to gain share."

Among the obvious questions is will this deal work? Time's Technologizer blog offers this answer:

"I'm not predicting disaster. It would be fun if it led to a golden age of Windows smartphones, and good for consumers. But I can't think of any past examples of anything similar happening and turning out well. (Let's not even bring up HP's acquisition of Palm. Oops! Just did.) ...

"Then again, this deal doesn't necessarily need to change everything to be worth a try. Microsoft has plenty of cash, and the cash it's paying Nokia consists of overseas profits which it wouldn't otherwise bring home to the U.S. for tax reasons. Windows Phone is currently a struggling number three in the smartphone platform wars; if it ends up a healthy, competitive number three, Microsoft might be happy it spent the money.

"In other words: If the deal ends up looking even modestly successful, it'll have beaten the historic odds."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.