"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Mexican Leftist Faces Uphill Task In Presidential Bid

Jun 29, 2012
Originally published on June 29, 2012 5:00 am

With just two days left before Mexicans elect a new president, polls show that the candidate of the former ruling party is poised to win the race by a wide margin. But there are those who don't want to see a return of the PRI, which ruled Mexico for more than 70 years until 2000 with a mix of corruption and cronyism. They say their best hope is leftist PRD party candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.

Lopez Obrador has been a central figure of the Mexican left for years. He protested the PRI's authoritarian rule in the 1980s and '90s and won Mexico City's mayoral race in 2000. This is his second run for the presidency. He lost in 2006 by less than a percentage point. This time around, polls show he's in second place.

This week, Lopez Obrador held his campaign's largest event with a march down Mexico City's Reforma Boulevard to the historic downtown Zocalo plaza where more than 100,000 crammed into the massive square and waited hours to see him.

Dolores Juarez, a Mexico City dentist, says she's not interested in the PRI's candidate and current front-runner, Enrique Pena Nieto, who is greatly admired for his youth and good looks.

"I'd rather have someone with experience and honesty," she said.

Manuel Salinas, 75, held up a handmade sign deploring current President Felipe Calderon's six-year-long war on drug traffickers. He said there's been too much bloodshed and too many innocent people killed, adding that Lopez Obrador will do better.

But like the other candidates in the race, Lopez Obrador has been light on specifics for how he would end the drug war that has claimed the lives of more than 50,000 people. He told the crowd the fix for Mexico's current ills is to create opportunities and stop corruption.

"We will do this by having incorruptible and honest public servants who will work more efficiently, intelligently and with perseverance," he said.

Lopez Obrador says he will do the same housecleaning to repair Mexico's economy and proposes balancing the budget by cutting politicians' salaries.

Critics say his economic proposals are too radical; they compare him to Venezuela's leftist President Hugo Chavez.

Political analyst Denise Dresser doesn't go that far but says Lopez Obrador lacks viable solutions. "He's not a man who understands how an economy works," she says. "He is averse to dismantling monopolies because he is basically a statist at heart."

Lopez Obrador has tried to tone down his usual combative rhetoric. He campaigns on building a "republic of love" and calls for "abrazos no ballazos" — hugs, not bullets.

Unfortunately, says analyst Jose Antonio Crespo, it's too little, too late.

"He started talking about peace, love and reconciliation just four months ago, and no one really believes Lopez Obrador could change so abruptly," he says.

Crespo says most people remember the weeks following Lopez Obrador's razor-thin presidential loss in 2006. Supporters clogged the streets of the capital for weeks while he proclaimed himself Mexico's legitimate president. Now there's concern about whether he will accept this year's results. In speeches he has talked of potential voter fraud and urged supporters to be vigilant, but on Thursday Lopez Obrador and the other major candidates signed a civility pact pledging to respect this Sunday's election results.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Mexicans will elect a new president on Sunday. Polls show the candidate of the former ruling party is poised to win by a wide margin. The Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as PRI, ruled Mexico for more than 70 years before being unseated 12 years ago. Those who do not want to see a return of the PRI say their best hope is from the leftist Party of the Democratic Revolution. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports from Mexico City.

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has been a central figure of the Mexican left for years. He protested the PRI's authoritarian rule in the 1980s and '90s and won Mexico City's mayoral race in 2000. This is his second run for the presidency. He lost in 2006 by less than a percentage point. This time around, polls show he's in second place.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (Chanting in Spanish)

KAHN: This week, Obrador held his campaign's largest event with a march down Mexico City's Reforma Boulevard to the historic downtown Zocalo plaza, where more than 100,000 people crammed into the massive square and waited hours to see him. Dolores Juarez, a Mexico City dentist, says she's not interested in the PRI's candidate and current frontrunner, Enrique Pena Nieto, who's greatly admired for his youth and good looks.

DOLORES JUAREZ: (Spanish spoken)

KAHN: I'd rather have someone with experience and honesty, she said.

Seventy-five-year-old Manuel Salinas held up a handmade sign deploring current President Felipe Calderon's six-year-long war on drug traffickers.

MANUEL SALINAS: (Spanish spoken)

KAHN: Salinas said there has been too much bloodshed, too many innocent people killed. He says Obrador will do better.

But like the other candidates in the race, Lopez Obrador has been light on specifics for how he would end the drug war, which has claimed the lives of more than 50,000 people. He told the crowd the fix for Mexico's current ills is to create opportunity and stop corruption.

ANDRES MANUEL LOPEZ OBRADOR: (Spanish spoken)

KAHN: We will do this, he said, by having incorruptible and honest public servants who will work more efficiently, intelligently and with perseverance.

Lopez Obrador says he will do the same housecleaning to repair Mexico's economy, and proposes balancing the budget by cutting politicians' salaries. Critics say his economic proposals are too radical and compare him to Venezuela's leftist President Hugo Chavez. Political analyst Denise Dresser doesn't go that far, but says Lopez Obrador lacks viable solutions.

DENISE DRESSER: He's not a man who understands how an economy works. He is averse to dismantling monopolies because he's basically a statist at heart.

KAHN: Lopez Obrador has tried to tone down his usual combative rhetoric lately. He campaigns on building a republic of love and calls for abrazos no ballazos: hugs, not bullets. Unfortunately, says analyst Jose Antonio Crespo, it's too little, too late.

JOSE ANTONIO CRESPO: (Spanish spoken)

KAHN: Crespo says the candidate started talking about peace, love and reconciliation just four months ago, and no one really believes Lopez Obrador could change so abruptly. Most people remember the weeks following his razor-thin presidential loss in 2006. Supporters clogged the streets of the capital for weeks while he proclaimed himself Mexico's legitimate president. Now the concern is over how he will accept this year's results.

In speeches, he's talked of potential voter fraud and urged supporters to be vigilant. However, last night, Lopez Obrador and the other major candidates signed a civility pact, pledging to respect this Sunday's election results.

Carrie Kahn, NPR News, Mexico City. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.