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Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Mexican Crime Reporters Risk Becoming The Story

May 9, 2012
Originally published on May 10, 2012 9:37 am

Mexico is reeling from another round of brutal murders of journalists. Four journalists and photographers who covered the police beat have been killed in eastern Mexico's crime-ridden state of Veracruz.

There's a new call for the federal government to take measures to protect journalists in a country where more and more reporters censor themselves out of fear.

The ceremony to remember the most recent killings took place last weekend in Mexico City on the steps of the Monument of Independence between statues depicting peace and law.

As the names of murdered journalists were called, the emotional crowd responded: "He shouldn't have died."

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, more than 45 journalists have been killed or disappeared in Mexico since 2006. Some press advocacy organizations put the number much higher. They are among the many victims in an organized crime free-for-all that has killed more than 50,000 Mexicans in that time period.

The Latest Killings

Last Thursday, the dismembered bodies of two news photographers, a former photojournalist and another woman were found stuffed in sacks, floating in a canal in the port city of Veracruz in eastern Mexico.

Five days earlier, the body of Regina Martinez, an investigative reporter for the respected newsweekly Proceso, was found in her bathroom, beaten and strangled.

"The thing that characterized her reporting is that Regina gave voice to the vulnerable, to indigenous people and to the oppressed," says a Veracruz-based reporter who fled to Mexico City for his security and asked to remain anonymous.

"The situation of journalism in Veracruz has reached very high levels of fear," he says. "Perhaps it's safer for reporters to become like speaker cabinets that only say what others tell us. And we never investigate."

In fact, this is already the case in many Mexican states where the drug cartel war is raging, particularly where Los Zetas are active. This organized crime group, founded by army deserters, is especially savage against journalists who report unflattering crime news, or who take payoffs from rival cartels.

Attempt To Protect Journalists

With the upsurge in reporter killings, Mexico has attempted to protect journalists. Six years ago, it created a special prosecutor for crimes committed against journalists within the federal attorney general's office. But it's toothless, says journalism advocate Rogelio Hernandez.

"The special prosecutor to investigate the cases of journalists doesn't have a budget, a staff, or the backing of the attorney general, the Interior Ministry or the presidency. It's a game," Hernandez says. "They have demonstrated total inefficiency, ineffectiveness and ignorance."

The Mexican attorney general's office did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

Manuel Clouthier is a congressman from the northwestern state of Sinaloa, where the drug cartels are rampant. He's also a former newspaper publisher who is currently running a quixotic independent campaign for the presidency. He says it's easy to blame the drug cartels for threats against the media, but his experience suggests they are not the main problem.

"The majority of the aggressions against journalists come from those in power, not from organized crime," Clouthier says.

He says that up to 2009, when he was publisher of the Noreste newspaper in Culiacan, Sinaloa, threats and intimidation directed at reporters and his own family came more from politicians in power than from drug traffickers.

Last week, overwhelming majorities in both houses of the Mexican Congress approved a bill that would create urgent measures to protect journalists and human rights defenders. Among other actions, it would create a rapid response team that would move threatened journalists to a safe place within 36 hours.

The bill awaits the president's signature.

Such a law might ease anxiety in Veracruz, where skittish news directors have reportedly ordered their reporters not to attend the funerals of their dead colleagues, fearing more attacks.

This story was produced for broadcast by Marisa Peñaloza.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Mexico is reeling from another round of brutal murders. Four journalists and photographers who covered the police beat have been killed in the state of Veracruz. That's led to a new call for the Mexican government to protect journalists in a country where more and more reporters self-censor out of fear. NPR's John Burnett reports from Mexico City.

JOHN BURNETT, BYLINE: The ceremony to remember Mexico's most recent slain journalists took place last weekend on the steps of the Monument of Independence between statues depicting peace and law, concepts sorely needed in Mexican journalism today.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

BURNETT: As the names of murdered journalists were called out, the emotional crowd responded: He shouldn't have died. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, since 2006, more than 45 journalists have been killed or disappeared in Mexico. Some press advocacy organizations put the number much higher. They are collateral damage in an organized crime free-for-all that has killed more than 50,000 Mexicans in that time period.

Last Thursday, the dismembered bodies of two news photographers, a former photojournalist and another woman, were found stuffed in sacks floating in a canal in the port city of Veracruz. Five days earlier, the body of Regina Martinez, an investigative reporter for the respected news weekly Proceso, was found in her bathroom beaten and strangled.

After the journalist demonstration, a Veracruz-based reporter who fled to Mexico City for his safety sat down in a cafe over coffee. He asked to remain anonymous.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

BURNETT: The thing that characterized her reporting is that Regina gave voice to the vulnerable, to indigenous people and to the oppressed. The situation of journalism in Veracruz has reached very high levels of fear. Perhaps it's safer for reporters to only say what others tell us and never investigate.

In fact, this is already the state of journalism in many Mexican states where the cartel war is raging, particularly where Los Zetas are active. This organized crime group founded by army deserters is especially savage against journalists who report unflattering crime news or who take payoffs from rival cartels.

With the upsurge in reporter killings, Mexico has attempted to protect journalists. Six years ago, it created the special prosecutor for attention to crimes committed against journalists within the federal attorney general's office. But it's toothless, says journalism advocate Rogelio Hernandez.

ROGELIO HERNANDEZ: (Foreign language spoken)

BURNETT: The special prosecutor to investigate the cases of journalists doesn't have a budget, a staff or the backing of the attorney general, the interior ministry or the presidency. It's a game, Hernandez says. They have demonstrated total inefficiency, ineffectiveness and ignorance. The Mexican attorney general's office did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

Manuel Clouthier is a congressman from the drug state of Sinaloa and a former newspaper publisher who's currently running a quixotic independent campaign for the presidency. He says it's easier to blame the narcos for threats against the media, but his experience informs him differently.

MANUEL CLOUTHIER: (Foreign language spoken)

BURNETT: The majority of the aggressions against journalists come from those in power, not from organized crime, Clouthier says. Last week, overwhelming majorities in both houses of the Mexican congress approved a bill that would create urgent measures to protect journalists and human rights defenders. Among other actions, it would create a rapid response team that would move threatened journalists to a safe place within 36 hours. The bill awaits the president's signature.

Such a law might ease anxiety in Veracruz, where skittish news directors have reportedly ordered their reporters not to attend the funerals of their dead colleagues, fearing more attacks.

John Burnett, NPR News, Mexico City. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.