Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Methane, Soot Are Targets Of New U.S. Climate Initiative

Feb 16, 2012

The United States and five other nations are embarking on a new program to limit pollutants connected to global warming. But they're not targeting carbon dioxide with this effort — instead, they're looking at methane gas, and soot.

NPR's Richard Harris filed this report for our Newscast desk:

"Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says the U.S. is teaming up with Canada, Mexico, Sweden, Ghana and Bangladesh to get countries thinking about some potent contributors to climate change."

"For example, soot from diesel engines and wood-burning stoves contribute significantly to global warming. But if you can cut back on it, you can make a difference quickly. Methane is another gas in that category. So are refrigerants called HFCs."

"Most global warming is caused by carbon dioxide, so dealing with these other gases alone won't solve the problem. But a United Nations study last year identified inexpensive ways to cut these other gases. Now the State Department is pledging $12 million of seed money to get an international conversation started."

The new plan follows a strategy recommended by an increasing number of climate scientists, who are tired to banging their collective head against the wall of carbon dioxide.

For example, in a report last month by Christopher Joyce, he spoke to Durwood Zaelke, founder of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, who said that particularly in a weak global economy, placing limits on carbon dioxide — seen as a byproduct of economic activity — is too problematic.

Here's what Zaelke told Christopher: "I mean, it's like picking a fight with the biggest bully in the schoolyard. You know, you get your lunch money stolen, you get your pants pulled down, and you get sent home humiliated. We've made about that much progress with CO2."

So, the focus shifts to methane and soot. As NASA climate scientist Drew Shindell told Christopher in that same story, "these things really have an immediate and quite powerful, in many cases, effect on climate both at global and regional scales."

The Washington Post has more information about the new program, which will also benefit from a $3 million contribution from Canada. Or, you can visit the State Department's site.

Methane was in the news last week in Germany, where a new energy plant makes biogas from fruit and vegetable waste.

As a report in Gizmag notes, "while two thirds of the biogas produced at the Stuttgart plant is methane, around 30 percent is carbon dioxide, which is also used to cultivate the algae. Meanwhile, the remaining sludgy fermentation residue is delivered to the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, where it is also converted into methane."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.