"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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'Mama Bird' Evelyn Johnson Dies At 102; Logged 7 Years Of Flight Time

May 11, 2012
Originally published on May 27, 2016 6:00 am

Evelyn Bryan Johnson, a record-setting pilot who was born just six years after the Wright brothers made their historic flight, has died at the age of 102. Johnson, who began flying in 1944, holds the Guinness world record for the most hours logged by a female pilot — more than 57,000.

In addition to her accomplished flying record, Johnson also helped many other pilots earn their wings. After one student called her Mama Bird, the nickname stuck with Johnson, as she gave lessons and FAA flight exams to thousands of pilots.

Johnson made an impact on aviation that will last beyond her years — by her own estimation, she trained some 5,000 pilots, including many who are today flying commercial jetliners and cargo planes.

"Two of them turned out to be vice presidents of US Air," she told NPR's Scott Simon back in 2003. "One of them was a 30-year pilot for FedEx; one of the girls flies for American out of New York; some of the other girls fly for United, Delta. There's lots of girls, as well as boys."

Johnson lived in Morristown, Tenn., where she was the longtime manager of the Moore-Murrell Airport — a position she held beyond her 100th birthday, and seemingly up to the time of her death Thursday.

Update at 7 p.m. ET: We've added audio to the top of this post — a remembrance from Charlie Mayer, NPR's director of operations. Charlie was Scott's producer when they visited Johnson in Tennessee; he also later flew with her. His story aired on All Things Considered Friday.

As the AP reports, "Johnson was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in Dayton, Ohio, in 2007. At that time, she had been flying for 55 years and had spent the equivalent of seven years in flight."

Those flights included several exploits, as Johnson told TAP TV last year. There was the time she flew in a race from Washington, D.C., to Havana, Cuba; the two times her engine failed, forcing her to land in fields; the flight that ended smoothly despite an engine on fire. Johnson also became one of the first women to earn a helicopter pilot's license, joining a group known as the Whirly Girls.

In 1958, Jonson's quick action after witnessing a helicopter crash earned her recognition from the Carnegie Hero Fund. The injured pilot was still in the wreckage when Johnson crawled beneath the whirling blades to turn off the machine's motor. She then sprayed the wreck with a fire extinguisher to prevent an explosion.

At the time of her death, Johnson had flown more than any other living pilot. She spoke with Scott Simon on the occasion of her 94th birthday, when she told him how flying airplanes always helped clear her head of life's worries.

"It's a different world from anything else. When you get up there and you fly around, everything is so beautiful. It's just wonderful like that," she told Scott. "And then, while you're up there, you forget about your problems while you're up. You've still got 'em, but that doesn't matter, you've had a little rest from it. It's just a wonderful thing."

That interview took place six years before Johnson's hundredth birthday — an occasion she said she was looking forward to. Johnson told Scott how she'd like to spend the day.

"Here's what I'd like: Willard Scott will be telling about me being 100 years old," she said. "But I wouldn't hear him — because I'd be up flying."

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