Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Kentucky To Face Kansas In NCAA Title Game

Apr 1, 2012
Originally published on May 11, 2012 10:33 pm

The national championship game in men's college basketball is set. The Jayhawks beat Ohio State in a close one and Kentucky got past Louisville.

At the nine-minutes-to-go mark in games one through four of Kentucky's romp through the NCAA tournament, the Wildcats have had leads of 13, 11, 18 and 30 points. So it was significant that the Louisville Cardinals actually found themselves tied with Kentucky at that nine-minute juncture.

But John Calipari's Wildcats once more pulled ahead, and this time the Cardinal's desperate press was shredded by the Cats. Kentucky's last three field goal were dunks, each more emphatic than the last. After the game, Louisville coach Rick Pitino was gracious.

"To tell you the truth, I haven't always liked some of the Kentucky teams. I'm not going to lie to you ... but I really like this team a lot because of their attitude and the way they play," he said. "Louisville will be rooting for Kentucky, which doesn't happen very often, to bring home that trophy to the state."

In the second game of the double header, the Ohio State Buckeyes took a 9-point lead into halftime, but Kansas adopted a different attitude upon exiting their locker room, as summarized by their coach Bill Self.

"The second half, it seemed like to me that, OK guys, enough of the nonsense. Let's go play and at least give ourselves a chance," he said. "And, God, we played good the second half."

A 13-to-4 run in the first six minutes tied the score. But Ohio State raged back and retook the lead. Kansas made a layup and all four of its free throws down the stretch, and then with 4 seconds left, Self decided to foul Ohio State's Aaron Craft with the Jayhawks up three. This meant that craft would have to make a foul shot, then miss intentionally and grab the rebound, which he could not do.

The game was over. That coaching move — to foul rather than allow a tying three pointer — is not Self's usual style.

"Well, you know, we don't ever do that. ... We never do that, but I told our guys foul him," he said.

That decision reveals a lot about Self. First of all, fouling in that situation usually is the right move — the best study on the subject was co-authored by a coach and a math professor at DePauw University. Coaches often defend their decision not to foul by saying, "I don't believe in that" or "we never foul," as if consistency equals the optimal play. It does not.

So Self showed flexibility. And, of course, the Jayhawks famously won a championship after a rival coach's decision not to foul up three late. The opposing coach was Calipari, who took note.

Monday night he gets his chance to show what lessons he's learned.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The national championship game in men's college basketball is set. The two winningest programs in the sport, Kansas and Kentucky, will face off Monday night. The Jayhawks beat Ohio State in a close one last night, and Kentucky got past Louisville. NPR's Mike Pesca was at the games and has more.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: At the nine minutes to go mark in games one through four of Kentucky's romp through the NCAA tournament, the Wildcats have had leads of 13, 11, 18 and 30 points. So, it was significant that the Louisville Cardinals actually found themselves tied with Kentucky at that nine-minute juncture. But John Calipari's Wildcats once more pulled ahead and this time the Cardinals desperate press was shredded by the Cats. Kentucky's last three field goals were dunks, each more emphatic than the last. After the game, Louisville Coach Rick Pitino was gracious.

RICK PITINO: To tell you the truth, I haven't always liked some of the Kentucky teams. I'm not going to lie to you. I haven't always liked. But I really like this team a lot because of their attitude and the way they play. And Louisville will be rooting for Kentucky, which doesn't happen very often, to bring home that trophy to the state.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

PESCA: Not your state, our state. Ohio State, screamed thousands of Buckeye fans in the second game of the doubleheader. The Buckeyes took a nine-point lead into halftime, but Kansas adopted a different attitude upon exiting their locker room, as summarized by their coach Bill Self.

BILL SELF: Yeah, but the second half it seems like to me that, OK, guys, enough of the nonsense; lets go play and at least give ourselves a chance. And, God, we played good the second half.

PESCA: A 13-to-4 run in the first six minutes tied the score. But Ohio State raged back and retook the lead. But Kansas made a layup and all four of its free throws down the stretch, and then with four seconds left Self decided to foul Ohio State's Aaron Craft with the Jayhawks up three. This meant that Craft would have to make a foul shot then miss intentionally, grab the rebound and score, which he and his teammates could not do. The game was over. The coaching move to foul rather than allow a tying three-pointer is not Self's usual style.

SELF: Well, you know, we don't ever do that. I mean, if you foul, we never do that. But I told our guys: foul him.

PESCA: That decision reveals a lot about Self. First of all, fouling in that situation usually is the right move. The best study on the subject was co-authored by a former coach and a math professor at DePauw University. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: Co-author Bill Fenlon is still head basketball coach at DePauw.] Coaches often defend their decision not to foul by saying I don't believe in that or we never foul, as if consistency equals the optimal play. It does not. So, Self showed flexibility. And the Jayhawks famously won a championship after a rival coach's decision not to foul up three late. The opposing coach was John Calipari, who took note. Tomorrow night, he gets his chance to show what lessons he's learned. Mike Pesca, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: This is NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.