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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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In Iowa, The Final GOP Ground Game Takes Shape

Dec 20, 2011
Originally published on May 23, 2012 11:11 am

Two weeks from Tuesday, Iowa voters will head out to almost 1,800 caucus sites to help select a Republican presidential nominee. It could be cold. It could also be snowing. And the campaigns know they'll have to work hard to make sure their supporters show up. Those get-out-the-vote efforts could make all the difference in a race that now appears to be up for grabs.

Drake University student Ben Levine is home right now in Minnesota for the holidays. But next week, he'll be back in Iowa joining an army of young volunteers who plan to spend their holiday break working for Ron Paul.

"We'll be doing a lot of ground campaigning, going door to door, talking to Iowa voters directly," Levine says. "We'll be doing a lot of phone calls, phone banking from the headquarters in Iowa to get the vote out, remind people who are staunch Ron Paul supporters to go out and vote."

Paul is the oldest of the candidates by far, but his campaign has generated strong interest among the youngest voters: students. The Texas congressman's opponents openly admit he has the most enthusiastic, if not the best, ground operation in the state — and that it could put him over the top on Jan. 3.

"I want things to change so desperately that I'm willing to go all-out and campaign for him. I think the enthusiasm really comes, because young people when they get behind something, they have a ton of energy," says Levine.

And that's what it takes — reminding supporters to not only show up and vote, but to get their friends out, too. All the campaigns have lists of potential backers whom they'll contact repeatedly in the days ahead.

"Obviously, we'd love your support at the caucus. ... But we also need folks to help at the caucus and to help us before the caucus," former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum told a group of potential supporters in Carroll, Iowa, last week.

Aides were there to pass around a signup sheet for precinct captains and postcards that people can send to their friends.

"Bumper stickers, yard signs, talk to your friends. I'd be happy to stick around a few minutes if you want to take pictures. Put them up on Facebook. Tweet. Talk to your friends. Network. Try to get them to come to the caucus for us," urged Santorum.

"Real estate professionals talk about the three most important factors being location, location and location. In electoral politics, the three most important factors are turnout, turnout and turnout," explains Dennis Goldford, politics professor at Drake.

Goldford says it's a little like a chain letter. You get some base support and then try to spread it from one person to the next. A good ground operation isn't sufficient to win, Goldford says, but it is necessary.

He notes that former House Speaker Newt Gingrich was in the lead and is now the target of aggressive attacks from his opponents. But he doesn't have much of a ground organization to help out.

Gingrich "didn't have the infrastructure in place to build on that initial enthusiasm for him. And so it's not there as a safety net when he starts to fall back," says Goldford.

Goldford says Mitt Romney has a better ground organization, but the former Massachusetts governor hasn't spent much time in the state.

And for getting out the vote in Iowa, it's also all about personalize, personalize, personalize.

Which is one reason that Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann is making 99 separate video appeals, one for each of the 99 Iowa counties she is currently scheduled to visit before the caucuses.

Bachmann's campaign manager, Keith Nahigian, says the messages will be used in caucus training videos. They'll go to supporters around the state, so they know exactly where and when to go vote.

"On the ground is where Iowa happens. If you're not on the ground, you're not going to win," says Nahigian.

Which is why Levine can't wait to get back on the ground to promote his favorite candidate. Caucus night also happens to be Levine's 20th birthday.

"I'm pretty excited, actually," Levine says. "I decided that the best birthday present I could get is for Paul to win in Iowa."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We just heard reference to the Iowa caucuses as a turnout exercise. And turnout is a big challenge. Two weeks from tonight in Iowa, it is likely to be cold. It could be snowing and the campaigns know that they'll have to work hard to make sure that their supporters show up.

As NPR's Pam Fessler explains, efforts to get out the vote in Iowa could make all the difference.

PAM FESSLER, BYLINE: Drake University student, Ben Levine is home right now in Minnesota for Christmas. But come December 27th, he'll be back in Iowa joining an army of young volunteers who plan to spend their holiday break working for Ron Paul.

BEN LEVINE: You know, going door-to-door, talking to Iowa voters directly. We'll be doing a lot of phone calls, phone banking, from the headquarters in Iowa to get the vote out, remind people who are staunch, you know, Ron Paul supporters to go out and vote.

FESSLER: Paul is the oldest of the candidates by far, but his campaign has generated strong interest among the youngest voters - students. The Texas congressman's opponents openly admit he has the most enthusiastic, if not the best, ground operation in the state and that it could put him over the top on January 3rd.

LEVINE: I want things to change so desperately that I'm willing to go all out and campaign for him. I think the enthusiasm really comes because young people, when they get behind something, they have a ton of energy.

FESSLER: And that's what it takes. Reminding supporters to not only show up and vote, but to get their friends out, too. All the campaigns have lists of potential backers who they'll contact repeatedly in the days ahead.

RICK SANTORUM: Obviously, we'd love your support at the caucus, but we also need folks to help us at the caucus and to help us before the caucus.

FESSLER: Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum is making his pitch to a group of potential supporters in Carroll, Iowa. Aides pass out a signup sheet for precinct captains and postcards that people can send to their friends.

SANTORUM: Bumper stickers, yard signs. And I'd be happy to stick around for a few minutes. If you want to take pictures, put them up on your Facebook, tweet, talk to your friends, network. Try to get them to come to the caucus for us.

DENNIS GOLDFORD: Where real estate professionals talk about the three most important factors being location, location and location. In electoral politics, the three most important factors are turnout, turnout and turnout.

FESSLER: Dennis Goldford is a politics professor at Drake University in Des Moines. Goldford says a good ground operation isn't sufficient to win, but it is necessary. He notes that former House Speaker, Newt Gingrich, who was in the lead, is now the target of aggressive attacks from opponents and he doesn't have much of a ground organization to help.

GOLDFORD: He didn't have the infrastructure in place to build on that initial enthusiasm for him, and so it's not there as a safety net when he starts to fall back.

Goldford said Mitt Romney's organization is better, but that the former Massachusetts governor hasn't spent much time in the state. And for getting out Iowa's voters, it's also about personalize, personalize, personalize.

MICHELE BACHMANN: Hi everyone. I'm Michele Bachmann. We're here in Rockwell City at the Pizza Ranch in Calhoun County. I need your support...

FESSLER: Which is one reason the Minnesota congresswoman is making 99 separate video appeals, one for each of the counties she plans to visit.

BACHMANN: Would you take just a minute to watch this video and, together, we will make Barack Obama a one-term president. Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

FESSLER: Campaign manager, Keith Nahigian, says these are caucus training videos, which will go out to supporters so that they know exactly how the caucuses work and where and when to go vote.

KEITH NAHIGIAN: On the ground is where Iowa happens. If you're not on the ground, you're not going to win.

FESSLER: Which is why student Ben Levine can't wait to get back on the ground to promote his favorite candidate. Caucus night also happens to be Levine's 20th birthday.

LEVINE: Yeah. I'm pretty excited, actually. I've decided that the best birthday present I could get is for Paul to win in Iowa.

FESSLER: Pam Fessler, NPR News, Des Moines. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.