"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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'Incredible' Race: America's Lopez Lomong Sets 2012 World Record [VIDEO]

May 1, 2012
Originally published on August 11, 2012 3:07 pm

The sports world is brimming with talk about Lopez Lomong, the American runner who set a 2012 world best in the men's 5,000-meter race in California Sunday. It was Lomong's first race at that distance (just over 3 miles), which he covered in 13 minutes and 11.63 seconds. But the race took a very unusual turn in its final laps.

The race, called "incredible" by the Recover Your Stride blog and others, is archived by the Flo Track site, so you can see for yourself what all the fuss is about (skip to the 11:30 mark, if you want to save time). In it, you can hear how the announcers' comments go from "Look at him go!" to "Uh-oh!"

(Spoiler alert: We'll now be talking about the race itself.)

Update at 2:30 p.m. EDT: We've updated the text of this post to make it more clear that Lomong didn't set the all-time world record, but the best time of this year. The word "record" has been replaced by the word "best." Our original post continues:

The video shows how Lomong launches himself from second place, setting up a strong sprint to the finish line. Crossing the line, Lomong takes up a slowdown trot with his hands raised, as many runners do. But most of them wait until the end of the race to do that — and there was still one more lap remaining in Lomong's event.

The crowd and race officials point and wave, urging him to keep running. After a brief delay, Lomong speeds up to a jog to get back on the pace. And all the while, the pack of runners he had left behind was trying to catch him.

Lomong maintained a gap on the other runners as he won the race. But his stride wasn't as free and easy as it had been, and he later said the lactic acid that had built up in his muscles took away some of his kick.

"I kinda miscalculated," a visibly winded Lomong told Flotrack moments later. "I kinda paid a little price out there."

Lopez said that when it dawned on him that he had another lap to go, he thought, "Oh my goodness, I thought, 'No way, it's not going to happen.' When somebody said, 'You got one more lap to go,' I was like, 'Oh, okay!'"

For the record, on standard 400-meter tracks, runners must race 12.5 laps to rack up 5000 meters.

"I guess I slept the whole way and didn't know what was going on," Lopez told The Mercury News. "It's a lot of laps, you know."

The race, part of the Stanford Payton Jordan Cardinal Invitational, was a continuation of Lomong's effort to compete in longer distances. He is widely regarded as the top U.S. threat in the 1,500-meter distance for this summer's Olympics.

Lopez's time Sunday was the best in the 5000-meter distance this year. The current all-time world record for the event is 12:37:35, a time set by Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia in 2004.

At just 27, Lopez Lomong has already overcome many setbacks in his life. In fact, as NPR has previously reported, Lomong "started out running for his life" in his native southern Sudan. He was kidnapped by rebel fighters when he was six, but he escaped after several weeks. His website describes how:

"After weeks of watching other boys slowly die in the rebel camp, Lopez was able to escape through a hole in the fence with the help of three other boys. Lopez and these boys ran for three days through the African plains until they reached Kenya and were placed in a refugee camp."

After 10 years in the camp, Lomong became one of the "Lost Boys of Sudan," emigrating to the United States. He went on to star in track at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff.

And as Tom Goldman reported back in 2008, Lomong was chosen to carry the American flag during the Beijing Summer Olympics' opening ceremonies.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.