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Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

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At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Immigration Law Slows A Family's March Forward

Jun 14, 2012
Originally published on June 14, 2012 10:33 am

Immigrant success stories are closely woven into the concept of the American dream. In South Carolina, two generations of an immigrant family have worked hard to live out their dreams, but anti-illegal immigration laws have put even legal immigrants like them on edge.

Working Upon Arrival

Angel Cruz became a field worker in the Dominican Republic when he was just 8 years old. He came to New York in 1964 when he was 25 and went on to do a variety of jobs — from making coat hangers to sanding cabinets in a factory. He worked in landscaping and as a carpenter. It was hard, he says.

His wife, Eva, came a bit later, leaving their three children behind until the couple could make enough money to bring them to the U.S. Eva Cruz sewed dresses for dolls and cleaned hotel rooms. Ten months later, she brought her three children. She hadn't stopped working.

"I [worked] all the time," she says. "I [worked] in night and day."

Eva Cruz is proud her family never received any government help, like food stamps. They saw the American dream as a chance for a better life for them and the possibility of a good education for their children. The Cruzes never made it out of elementary school in the Dominican Republic.

Just three years ago, they bought a three-bedroom ranch house in the Charleston suburbs with the cash they saved all these years.

Angel, now 73, raises chickens in his backyard. There's a rooster and a dozen baby chicks scurrying around. On a scorching spring day, Angel's youngest grandson, Christopher, plays in a blue kiddy pool.

In the 40 years since they became citizens, this couple built their dream.

Hurt By The Law

Their fourth child, Angel Luis Cruz, was the only one born in the U.S. After high school, he built a small insurance company in North Charleston that serves Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers.

Just a few blocks from where his parents live, he's up early making breakfast for his three children.

Angel Luis Cruz, who turns 40 next week, says his business was doing fine until South Carolina passed legislation to get rid of illegal immigrants.

"I don't understand what the state is doing," he says. "Instead of embracing people, they're rejecting them."

The law allows police to stop suspected illegal immigrants and ask for proof of citizenship. The can be deported if they don't have papers and are in the country illegally.

Angel Luis Cruz says he's lost more than half his business since the law passed. Although the law hasn't gone into effect yet because of legal challenges, he says it's had a big impact: Many in the Latino community have left the area.

"This immigration law is hurting us — and not just us here — across the whole country," he says. "They're not thinking about Angel Insurance Agency. They're not thinking about such-and-such other business."

To make up for his losses, Angel Luis Cruz just opened a second office, two hours away in Hilton Head.

He hits the road six days a week now, while his wife staffs the Charleston office.

'I'm American'

Angel Luis Cruz is a devoted American. He loves this country. He joined the Army and served in the Gulf War. But he's tired and confused about being treated like he's not a citizen.

"I don't really ... rate myself as ... Hispanic like that because ... I grew up in this country. ... I' m American, you know? ... I don't see myself like that," he says.

He's only had a couple of customers since this office opened a few weeks ago, but he's optimistic. Angel Luis Cruz believes his American dream is still attainable, though it may take longer than he originally imagined.

"I want to laugh, and I want to enjoy life, and I want to make a difference in this world," he says.

Back at home, after 9:30 in the evening, Angel Luis Cruz is clearly worn out. His family, including 3-year-old Hailey, 7-year-old Angel Alexander and his wife, Prissy, are all up waiting for him.

"Like I tell my son all the time, 'Angel, we do what have to do now so tomorrow we can do what we [want to do].' So you have to make sacrifices in life," he says. "And then, sooner later it's going to pay off, and if we don't ever get to see it, it's all right because we're going to instill this in our children that you work hard and you move forward."

Angel Luis Cruz still worries about the immigration law. He says he doesn't want his kids to face the same intolerance that he has experienced. He says he has faith that America is still the best place for families to create their own dreams.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In our ongoing series about the American dream, we've been exploring what it means and how it's changing. The immigrant experience is essential to it. But in some Southern states, the fight against illegal immigration has put many legal immigrants on edge. NPR's Kathy Lohr traveled to South Carolina to speak to two generations of an immigrant family about their American dreams.

KATHY LOHR, BYLINE: Angel Cruz became a field worker in the Dominican Republic when he was just eight years old. He came to New York in 1964 when he was 25, and went on to do a variety of jobs, from making coat hangers to sanding cabinets in a factory, as one of his sons helps explain.

ANGEL CRUZ: (Through translator) It was hard to work.

I work in landscape.

LOHR: Landscaping.

CRUZ: Landscaping. A carpenter, too.

LOHR: His wife, Eva, came a bit later, leaving their three children behind until the couple could make enough money to bring them to the U.S. Eva sewed dresses for dolls and cleaned hotel rooms.

EVA CRUZ: I bring my family 10 months. My three kids, I bring them here.

LOHR: In 10 months, you were able to bring your children here.

CRUZ: Yes. Yes. You know, because I no stop. I worked all the time. I work night and day.

LOHR: Eva is proud her family never received any government help, like food stamps. They saw the American dream as a chance for a better life for them, and the possibility of a good education for their children. Angel and Eva never made it out of elementary school in the Dominican Republic. Just three years ago, they bought a three-bedroom ranch house in the Charleston suburbs with the cash they saved all these years.

Angel, who's 73 now, raises chickens in his backyard. A rooster and a dozen baby chicks are scurrying around. On this scorching spring day, Angel's youngest grandson, Christopher, is here playing in a blue kiddy pool.

CHRISTOPHER CRUZ: I swim, yeah.

CRUZ: Yeah? You want to go swimming?

LOHR: In the 40 years since they became citizens, this couple built their dream. Their fourth child, Angel Luis Cruz, was the only one born in America. After high school, he built a small insurance company in North Charleston that serves Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers. Just a few blocks from where his parents live, Angel Luis is up early, making breakfast for his three kids.

Angel, who turns 40 next week, says his business was doing fine until South Carolina passed legislation to get rid of illegal immigrants.

ANGEL LUIS CRUZ: I don't understand what the state is doing. Instead of, you know, embracing people, they're rejecting them.

LOHR: Cruz says he's lost more than half his business since the law passed. It allows police to stop people they suspect are in the country illegally and ask for proof of citizenship. If an undocumented worker doesn't have papers, they can be deported. Even though the law hasn't gone into effect yet, because of legal challenges, Cruz says it's had a big impact, as many in the Latino community have left the area.

CRUZ: This immigration law is hurting us, and not just us here, across the whole country. They're not thinking about Angel Insurance Agency. They're not thinking about such-and-such other business.

LOHR: To make up for his losses, Angel Luis just opened a second office, two hours away in Hilton Head. He hits the road six days a week now, while his wife staffs the Charleston office. Cruz is a devoted American. He loves this country. He joined the Army and served in the Gulf War. But he's tired and confused about being treated like he's not a citizen.

CRUZ: Because I, you know, I grew up in this country, you know. I'm American. I'm not - you know, I don't see myself like that.

LOHR: He's only had a couple of customers since this office opened a few weeks ago, but he's optimistic. Cruz believes his American dream is still attainable, even though it may take longer than he originally imagined.

CRUZ: I want to laugh and I want to enjoy life, and I want to make a difference in this world.

LOHR: Back at home, after 9:30 in the evening, Angel is clearly worn out. His family, including three-year-old Hailey, seven-year-old Angel Alexander and his wife, Prissy, are all up waiting for him.

CRUZ: You know, like I tell my son all the time, Angel, we do what have to do now so tomorrow we can do what we...

ALEX ALEXANDER: Want to do.

CRUZ: ...want to do. So you have to make sacrifices in life, and then, sooner or later, it's going to pay off. And if we don't ever get to see it, it's all right because we're going to instill this in our children that you work hard and you move forward.

LOHR: Cruz still worries about the immigration law. He says he doesn't want his kids to face the same intolerance that he has experienced.

CRUZ: Can you say it? Our Father...

ALEXANDER: Our Father...

CRUZ: ...who art in heaven.

ALEXANDER: ...who art in heaven.

CRUZ: ...allowed be thy name.

ALEXANDER: ...hallowed be thy name.

CRUZ: Thy kingdom come...

LOHR: Angel Luis Cruz says he says he has faith that America is still the best place for families to create their own dreams. Kathy Lohr, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.