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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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At Holocaust Museum, Clinton And Wiesel Urge Young To Remember

Apr 29, 2013

"You are our witnesses because you will go beyond our lives," Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel told the world's young people Monday morning during an event to mark the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum's opening.

And former President Bill Clinton, who was in office when the museum opened in Washington, D.C., picked up on that theme. "You know the truth. You have enshrined it here," he said to those gathered, many of them students and others a generation or more younger than Clinton. "You must continue to work to give it to all human kind."

The ceremony was somber not only because of the history the museum preserves — about the persecution and murder of about 6 million Jews by Germany's Nazi regime and its collaborators during World War II — but also because fewer and fewer survivors of the Holocaust are still alive.

There were 843 Holocaust survivors at Monday's event, officials said, and 130 veterans of the war. Organizers chose to mark the museum's 20th anniversary instead of waiting until the 25th, The Associated Press reports, "because many survivors and vets may not be alive in another five years."

Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor himself, said young people should know "you are the flag bearers. ... It is your memory that inherits ours."

Clinton said the museum exists "to make sure that we will always be able to come here to remind us that no matter how smart a people are, if you have a head without a heart, you are not human."

The former president also said the sickness that led to Germany's Nazi state still exists. It's a sickness, he said, that leads the Taliban to shoot a Pakistani girl just because she wants to go to school. And it's a sickness, he noted, that leads someone to plant bombs near the finish line at the Boston Marathon.

Such sickness, Clinton added, is "still the biggest threat to children and grandchildren."

C-SPAN, which broadcast the event, has posted a video of it here.

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