Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Hezbollah Suspect May Face U.S. Military Commission

Feb 24, 2012
Originally published on February 24, 2012 4:18 pm

The Obama administration is seeking to try a Lebanese man linked to Hezbollah in a military commission, expanding the reach of the military tribunal beyond al-Qaida and Taliban suspects for the first time.

The man at the center of the case is Ali Musa Daqduq. He was the last detainee held by American forces in Iraq and had been turned over to Iraqi custody when U.S. forces formally withdrew from Iraq in December.

Daqduq is accused of helping to train insurgents in the use of roadside bombs, and allegedly helped organize a raid in January 2007 that killed five American soldiers and wounded three others.

Apparently the insurgents wore American-style uniforms and carried forged identity cards to get close enough to the U.S. soldiers to kill them. Daqduq was captured a short time later and allegedly confessed to the crimes. He had not, apparently, been subjected to any harsh interrogation techniques when he admitted to being part of the plot. News of the effort to resolve the Daqduq case in a military tribunal was first reported by the New York Times.

"Due to the president's concerns about the crimes Daqduq is alleged to have committed, we are working with Iraq to effect Daqduq's transfer to a U.S. military commission consistent with U.S. and Iraqi law," said Lt. Col. Todd Breasseale. "We are seeking the fastest possible way to bring him to justice."

Many Legal Hurdles

But officials close to the process tell NPR that the effort to bring Daqduq to a military commission is in the earliest stages.

While a prosecutor has drawn up the charges, the chief prosecutor at the military commissions, Gen. Mark Martins, has yet to approve them. Once those charges are approved by the chief prosecutor, they are then forwarded to a convening authority who makes an independent determination as to whether to refer the charges for trial. Nothing beyond the drawing up of charges has happened yet.

Officials familiar with the process tell NPR that the Daqduq charges will likely stay in Martins' office until there is some sort of resolution about whether Daqduq will be extradited to the U.S. or, more likely, taken to a third country to stand trial before a military commission.

Military commissions, by design, can be convened anywhere. They do not necessarily have to take place at the naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Breasseale said that there are multiple charges against Daqduq, including murder in violation of the law of war, attempted taking of hostages, perfidy, spying and terrorism.

A Special Case

The Daqduq case has been a special one for the U.S. for a number of reasons. He was the last prisoner held by U.S. forces in Iraq, and U.S. officials were concerned that he might be released or returned to Iran if he was left in Iraqi hands. Under an agreement with the Bush administration, however, the Iraq government controlled decisions about prisoners like Daqduq.

Late last year, during negotiations about prisoners, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki refused to allow the U.S. to remove Daqduq from Iraq summarily. The Iraqi leader said he would consider handing over Daqduq to the Americans if formal legal processes are followed. The preliminary charges appear to be part of an effort to do that.

"No doubt this is a very special case," said Matthew Waxman, who was a senior policy adviser on detainee affairs in the Bush administration and is now a professor at Columbia Law School. "And the administration will go to great pains to say this is not an expansion. However, having worked in this area for a while, I've come to learn that there will always be other special cases."

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