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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Google Tweaks Search To Boost Google+, And Rivals Get Angry

Jan 11, 2012

Social media has become a huge part of how people experience the web. So it's not surprising that Google's move to integrate "personal results" into its web searches — drawing from a user's Google+ profile — wasn't praised by the folks who run rival social networks.

While Google's move was widely seen as a way to help Google+ compete with Facebook, it drew the sharpest response from Twitter, which says Google's changes might keep people from learning about breaking news via tweets.

TechCrunch cites a statement from the company, which reads in part, "As we've seen time and time again, news breaks first on Twitter. As a result, Twitter accounts and Tweets are often the most relevant (search) results. We're concerned that as a result of Google's changes, finding this information will be much harder for everyone. We think that's bad for people, publishers, news organizations and Twitter users."

For its part, Google notes that neither Facebook nor Twitter allow the company to dig deeply when looking for search results. And the company notes that Twitter canceled the deal that once folded real-time tweets into the top of Google's results for some search terms.

On its corporate Google+ account, Google representative say they were "a bit surprised by Twitter's comments about Search plus Your World, because they chose not to renew their agreement with us last summer."

Google announced the tweak to its Search in a blog post Tuesday morning, promoting the new "Your World" approach by promising that it would add a sense of personal connectivity to search results.

The company said that would happen in three ways: "Personal Results," that show things like Google+ photos and posts; "Profiles in Search," which highlights people that might have helpful information; and "People and Pages," which finds profiles and Google+ pages related to a specific topic.

Google promises that "behind most every query, there's a community." But critics say the "community" featured in Search is restricted to Google+.

Over at Searchblog, John Battelle says it's a shame that Google and Facebook can't figure out a way to bring a social element to search that's both wide and deep.

"The unwillingness of Facebook and Google to share a public commons when it comes to the intersection of search and social is corrosive to the connective tissue of our shared culture," Battelle writes.

Google made headlines last month when it admitted to — and punished itself for — overstepping its bounds in promoting its web browser, Chrome. The company bought ads from an online agency, which hired another company to conduct the campaign.

The end result was that some bloggers were compensated for saying positive things about Chrome. As a penance, Google downgraded the search ranking of Chrome for 60 days.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.