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School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

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Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Sky's The Limit In Campaign Cash For Wis. Governor

Jun 5, 2012
Originally published on June 5, 2012 7:53 pm

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker vastly out-raised and outspent his Democratic challenger in the state's recall election, largely on the strength of major donations from across the country.

One reason for that was a quirk in Wisconsin law, which lets a governor in Walker's situation bypass limits on political donations.

Wisconsin law says candidates for governor normally may not take donations of more than $10,000 each. That was the limit under which Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, the Democrat, operated in the recall election being decided Tuesday at the polls.

But as governor, Walker had a different set of rules. A somewhat obscure state law passed in 1987 says that when a governor is facing a recall challenge, the normal donation limits are suspended for "the payment of legal fees and other expenses."

"What doesn't qualify for 'other expenses'? Not much," says Bill Lueders, who directs the Money and Politics Project at the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism.

For months, Lueders has been combing through campaign laws, financial disclosures, expense reports and other primary documents.

"Tom Barrett does have to abide by this $10,000 limit on individual contributions [and] he has gotten, as of today, 26 contributions of $10,000," Lueders says.

But Walker had more than four times the number of $10,000 contributions as Barrett, he says, and because Walker didn't have to abide by that limit at all, he raised 111 contributions of more than $10,000 each — largely from outside of Wisconsin.

"Fifty-nine percent of his overall contributions come from people in other states," Lueders says.

And three-quarters of the largest donations — those of $10,000 or more — came from donors in other states. They include ardent conservatives such as Foster Friess of Wyoming, the best known benefactor of former presidential candidate Rick Santorum; and Bob Perry of Texas, who has given more than $4 million to Mitt Romney's superPAC, and in 2004 sponsored the Swift Boat ads that attacked Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.

All this money has gone from funding the campaigns to being one of the main issues in the recall election.

"He thinks that this state is going to fall for that money coming from out of state," Barrett told supporters to applause at a recent rally. "We have news for him. He's got the mountains of money; I've got you."

Speaking to the local NBC affiliate in Madison, Walker tried to downplay the money advantage and focus on national labor union support for Barrett.

"I think they're trying to buy it, but not for me but against me," Walker said. "The money that's come in since last February is overwhelmingly from special interests, particularly big government unions in Washington who have tried to take me out."

About a quarter of Barrett's money came from outside of Wisconsin. In any other year, that would seem an astronomical amount, Lueders says. But this year it's dwarfed by Walker's out-of-state fundraising.

"I think both sides correctly perceive that the outcome in Wisconsin will have consequences for public workers and others throughout the country," Lueders says.

It's also early evidence of what campaign watchdogs have been predicting for 2012: national organizations, groups and individuals directing a torrent of cash at a few key states that have never seen anything like it before.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, to the role of money in this recall election. Governor Scott Walker outraised and outspent his challenger by far. Part of the reason for that - well, as NPR's Andrea Seabrook explains, a quirk in Wisconsin's election laws allowed Walker to bypass limits on political donations.

ANDREA SEABROOK, BYLINE: The law in Wisconsin says candidates for governor may not take donations of more than $10,000 a pop. That was the limit under which the challenger in this recall election, Tom Barrett, operated. But the governor, Scott Walker, had a different set of rules because of a somewhat obscure law passed in 1987. It says that when a governor is facing a recall challenge, the normal donation limits are suspended for, quote, "the payment of legal fees and other expenses."

What does other expenses cover? It's easier to ask what it doesn't cover.

BILL LUEDERS: What doesn't qualify as other expenses? Not much.

SEABROOK: Bill Lueders directs the Money and Politics Project at the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism. For months, he's been combing through campaign laws, financial disclosures, expense reports and other primary documents. This is what he's found.

LUEDERS: Tom Barrett does have to abide by this $10,000 limit on individual contributions. He has gotten, as of today, 26 contributions of $10,000.

SEABROOK: But Walker had him beat in two ways. First, Walker raised more than four times the number of $10,000 contributions. Second, because Walker didn't have to abide by that limit, he raised 111 contributions of more than $10,000. How'd he do it? Lueder says largely by going outside of Wisconsin.

LUEDERS: Fifty-nine percent of his overall contributions come from people in other states.

SEABROOK: And of those $10,000-plus donations, three-quarters came from donors in other states, ardent conservatives such as Foster Friess of Wyoming - the best-known Rick Santorum donor - and Bob Perry of Texas, the sponsor of the swift boat ads that attacked John Kerry in 2004. All this money has gone from funding the campaigns to being one of the campaign's main issues. Just a few days ago, Barrett tried to rally his supporters around the issue.

MAYOR TOM BARRETT: And he thinks that this state is going to fall for that money coming from out of state. We have news for him. He's got the mountains of money. I've got you.

SEABROOK: And speaking to the local NBC affiliate in Madison, Walker tried to downplay the money advantage and focus on national labor union support for his opponent.

GOVERNOR SCOTT WALKER: I think they're trying to buy it, but not for me, but against me. I mean, the money that's come in since last February has overwhelmingly been from special interests, particularly big government unions in Washington.

SEABROOK: Now, about a quarter of Barrett's money came from outside of Wisconsin. Lueders, the investigative journalist, says in any other year, that would seem an astronomical amount. But this year, it's dwarfed by Walker's out-of-state fundraising. That, says Lueders, shows how much this race has become a national battle.

LUEDERS: And I think both sides correctly perceive that the outcome in Wisconsin will have consequences for public workers and others throughout the country.

SEABROOK: It's also early evidence of a flood analysts and campaign watchdogs have been predicting for 2012, with national organizations, groups and individuals directing a torrent of cash at a few key states that have never seen anything like it before. Andrea Seabrook, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.