Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Fox In Socks! Dartmouth Names Its Medical School After Dr. Seuss

Apr 5, 2012
Originally published on April 5, 2012 5:04 pm

At the college of Dartmouth, in the year '24
There lived a young humorist named Theodor.
Though boozing was banned as a crime and a sin,
Theo hosted a party with plenty of gin.
But then in through the door without even a knock
Burst the grinch who stole gin-mas: Dean Craven Laycock.

The dean started shouting. His face turned bright red.
"Put down your tumbler and listen up, Ted!
I'm kicking you out of those clubs that you're in.
Your work won't be published at Dartmouth again!"

But Theodor just wouldn't take such abuse --
He published again — with the nom de plume Seuss!
Well, that name stuck. It's the one he would use
For Green Eggs and Oobleck and Horton and Whos.
Folks bought his books for their sons and their daughters
And Seuss sent the cash back to his alma mater.

Spring turned to summer and summer to autumn
(That whole gin episode was completely forgotten)
90 years passed. And then: a great honor
For Dartmouth's most famous, least medical doctor
They've renamed their medical school after him
And his wife! "It's a tribute," says President Kim*.

But I have a question (and maybe it's strange):
With this new name will the school itself change?
Will students write poems and skip their exams
Or learn to prescribe green eggs and green ham?
If your dear father's heart has come to a stop
Will your Dartmouth-trained doctor advise, "Hop on pop"?

Millions of Dr. Seuss fans are grateful for his cute pictures and great rhymes, but Dartmouth College is also grateful for his donations.

Dr. Seuss — whose real name was Theodor Geisel (Dartmouth Class of 1925) — liked to share his wealth with his alma mater, where he edited the humor magazine, the Jack-O-Lantern, until he was caught drinking gin.

In return, this week the New Hampshire college officially renamed its medical school "The Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine" in honor of the author and his second wife, a nurse, who is the 90-year-old curator of her late husband's works. (Dr. Seuss died in 1991.)

"Naming our school of medicine in honor of Audrey and Ted Geisel is a tribute to two individuals whose work continues to change the world for the better," says Dartmouth President Jim Yong Kim. "Ted Geisel lived out the Dartmouth ethos of thinking differently and creatively to illuminate the world's challenges and the opportunities for understanding and surmounting them."

Although he had no medical training, Dr. Seuss did write one sort of medical tome. It was, in fact, one of his few books for adults, called You're Only Old Once. A book for "obsolete children," it tells the story (circa 1986) of one moderately aged patient's experience going through a physical at the Golden Years Clinic. In typical wry fashion, it touches on everything from an initial "Eyesight and Solvency" test to being "properly pilled and properly billed."

No word yet on whether memorizing The Cat in the Hat will now become a requirement for medical school admission.


*Jim Yong Kim, president of Dartmouth College

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.