"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Desperate Sudanese Flee Bombing In Nuba Mountains

May 8, 2012
Originally published on May 8, 2012 7:41 am

The two Sudans appear to be complying with a U.N. ceasefire ultimatum, which came into force on Friday — ending weeks of bitter border fighting over oil.

But there remains a separate conflict in the Nuba Mountains region of Sudan that has forced thousands to flee bombardment and hunger for newly independent neighbor South Sudan.

Those refugees are streaming into the Yida camp in South Sudan, across the border from the Nuba Mountains in the South Kordofan area, Sudan's last remaining oil-producing state.

Communities there fought alongside the South during the long civil war. They say they are being punished for their loyalties and chased out by Sudanese government troops. Sudan claims pro-South rebels operate in the region. Human rights campaigners warn of ethnic cleansing by Sudan.

Resources Stretched Thin

In recent days, up to 500 to 550 people have been crossing the border each day, says Lise Grande, U.N. humanitarian coordinator for South Sudan. The camp has grown to house more than 27,000 refugees since it was set up in August last year.

"Now what they're telling us is that there's hunger on the other side," Grande says, adding that officials expect the numbers will keep rising.

Rania Mahmoud arrived at the camp over the weekend. Dressed in lime green cloth, she stands out against the dusty expanse of the camp. Mahmoud describes how bombs were raining down in the Nuba Mountains. So, she and six others, including her children, walked for five days to cross the border into South Sudan.

"Because of the war, plus the fact that there was no more food, we had to run away. The enemy was bombing us. You would hear 'boom' and we'd all have to hide. We were really frightened," she says.

The fleeing refugees need help — and food.

Resources are tightly stretched and the World Food Program's representative in South Sudan, Chris Nikoi, says stocking supplies at Yida has been delayed by recent clashes over oil at the north-south border.

"But we're confident that during the month of May, we will get the food here — enough to make sure that these people are fed right through the rainy season," Nikoi says, referring to rains that could last up to six months.

Safety and security also remain key concerns. Yida is easily within Sudan's shelling range and was bombed in November. Local parliamentarian Omer Ahmed Nogra displays a bomb that was dropped recently, near the school.

"We are afraid, because everyone now has a hole near his house. We are afraid," he says.

Civilians Suffering

But the refugees are reluctant to move on. That means more and more infants with malnutrition arrive every day, says Kelly Nau, health and nutrition coordinator for Samaritan's Purse, a U.S. aid organization.

"Of the children under 5, we've never seen so many malnourished in the history of the camp so far," she says.

"[The refugees] have been hiding out in caves to escape aerial bombardment and ground fighting," Nau says. "These people are telling me that they're eating leaves and they're boiling seeds, and they've come here just in search of food."

South Sudan's Deputy Minister for Humanitarian Affairs Sabrina Dario Lokolong says she hopes both her country and neighboring Sudan will respect a U.N. resolution seeking to end their conflicts.

"This issue should really come to an end. These are innocent civilians, they shouldn't be targeted," Lokolong says.

If there has to be war, let it be at the front, says the minister, not against the blameless.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.