"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Pages

Delayed At The Airport? They're Working On It

May 26, 2012
Originally published on May 26, 2012 10:52 am

When the summer travel season begins, airline passengers typically brace for delays as vacationers fly in larger numbers and the inevitable weather-related disruptions occur.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the nationwide system of air traffic control, is hoping to make some of those delays a thing of the past. It's developing what it calls "Next Generation" technology. The NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.

But as the government works out the details, questions remain about its cost and viability.

Aiming For Efficiency

It's a bright, sunny day at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. From the control tower, "we're looking out the window at the east airfield ... where there are four runways that are in active operation," says Michael Huerta, the FAA's acting administrator.

Except it's not really Dallas/Forth Worth. Huerta is in a government lab in New Jersey, looking at a computer-generated simulation.

"What this enables us to simulate is how controllers would use technology to control traffic, in this case at Dallas/Forth Worth airport," he says.

The William J. Hughes Technical Center, located next to the Atlantic City airport, is where the government is developing the NextGen system, including the equipment that air traffic controllers use in towers at airports across the country.

There are hundreds of technicians in the Atlantic City lab working on everything from how to transmit up-to-the-second weather information to pilots to the kinds of equipment or avionics that the airlines will need to install in their jets.

The goal, Huerta says, is an air traffic control system that allows more flights in the sky, better fuel efficiency and more closely spaced takeoffs and landings.

"Right now, conventional descent into an airport looks a lot like walking down the stairs, and a pilot will throttle up, throttle back, throttle up and throttle back. It's the aviation equivalent of stop-and-go driving in traffic, and it's very fuel inefficient," he says. "It also is rather noisy."

Huerta says NextGen allows a smooth, steady glide descent, akin to sliding down the banister. The FAA estimates the new technology will save over 1 billion gallons of fuel and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 14 million metric tons by 2020.

Getting The Big Picture

At one lab in the complex, new ways of tracking flights are tested by air traffic controllers who are brought in from the field.

Their responses are closely watched by Nick Marzelli. "What we can do is we can train a camera on them and then, as we introduce these anomalies in the system, to see how they're handled by the controllers," he says. "We're sort of recording them. We're recording their voice, if they're bantering about a little bit. We're recording what they're doing ambient-wise."

There is also a cockpit simulator, where pilots can try their hand at the controls of an Airbus jet.

Huerta says the point is to understand how the pilot and the air traffic controller can best share information. With NextGen, pilots will have a better sense of who and what is in the sky around them.

"What we're really trying to understand," Huerta says, through technology like the tower simulator and radar room simulator, is: "How is that whole interface working?"

A Long-Term Proposition

Transitioning from 1940s radar to current-day satellite-based technology isn't cheap.

The cost has been estimated at some $40 billion, to be shared by the government and the airlines. Congress this year agreed to spend some $4 billion over the next four years on NextGen.

But the private sector remains wary, says Joshua Schank, president of the ENO Center, a transportation think tank.

"The private sector is very risk-averse when it comes to making investments that they don't see an immediate return on — particularly the airline industry, which is an industry that has been suffering and really never made money its entire history," Schank says. "For them to go out on a limb and invest in a new technology with questionable benefits — it's just not going to happen."

Still, progress is being made. The FAA and some of the airlines are testing new landing approaches to take advantage of the more efficient technology at a handful of airports, including Seattle-Tacoma and Atlanta's Hartsfield. And NextGen has enabled controllers to track helicopter traffic to and from the Gulf of Mexico's oil rigs for the first time.

Huerta says nobody really opposes modernizing the air traffic control system, but he cautions it's going to be a long-term transformation.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The start of the summer travel season is upon us. Here's a familiar sound for vacationers.

(SOUNDBITE OF AIRPORT SECURITY CHECKPOINT)

SIMON: Airport security, but after passing through pat-downs and body scanners, many passengers take a look at the board and see a dreaded word: delayed. The Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the nationwide system of air traffic control, is hoping to make some of those delays a thing of the past. It's developing what it calls next generation technology. The program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.

But as the government works out the details, questions remain about the cost and viability. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: We're in the control tower at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW. It's a bright sunny day.

MICHAEL HUERTA: We're looking out the window at the east airfield of Dallas/Fort Worth where there are four runways that are in active operation.

NAYLOR: Well, OK, we're not really at the airport. We're in New Jersey at a government lab looking at a computer-generated simulation.

HUERTA: We can see the terminals in front of us and directly in front of us, we see the actual controller work stations.

NAYLOR: Michael Huerta, the FAA's acting administrator, is showing us around the William J. Hughes Technical Center located next to the Atlantic City Airport. It's where the government is developing the NextGen system, including the equipment that air traffic controllers use in towers at airports across the country.

HUERTA: What this enables us to simulate is how controllers would use technology to control traffic, in this case at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport.

NAYLOR: There are hundreds of technicians in the Atlantic City lab working on everything from how to transmit up-to-the-second weather information to pilots to the kinds of equipment or avionics that the airlines will need to install in their jets. The goal, Huerta says, an air traffic control system that allows more flights in the sky, better fuel efficiency and more closely spaced takeoffs and landings.

HUERTA: Right now, conventional descent into an airport looks a lot like walking down the stairs, and a pilot will throttle up, throttle back, throttle up and throttle back. It's the aviation equivalent of stop-and-go driving in traffic, and it's very fuel inefficient. But it also is rather noisy.

NAYLOR: Huerta says NextGen allows a smooth, steady glide descent, akin to sliding down the banister. The FAA estimates the new technology will save over a billion gallons of fuel and reduce CO2 emissions by 14 million metric tons by 2020. At one lab in the complex, new ways of tracking flights are tested by air traffic controllers who are brought in from the field.

(SOUNDBITE OF CONTROLLER CHATTER)

NAYLOR: Their responses are closely watched by Nick Marzelli.

NICK MARZELLI: What we can do is we can train a camera on them, and then as we introduce these anomalies in the system, to see how they're handled by the controllers, we're sort of recording them. We're recording their voice, if they're bantering about a little bit. We're recording what they're doing ambient-wise.

NAYLOR: There is also a cockpit simulator, where pilots - real and wannabe - can try their hand at the controls of an Airbus jet.

(SOUNDBITE OF PILOTS PRACTICING ON SIMULATOR)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Now, you can step over the seat.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Wow, cool. All right.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Why don't you move the joystick, and you'll...there you go. See, we're climbing. As you push the joystick to the left or right, we will turn the airplane....

NAYLOR: Michael Huerta says the point here is to understand how the pilot and the air traffic controller can best share information. With NextGen, pilots will have a better sense of who and what is in the sky around them.

HUERTA: What we're really trying to understand is, when we tie it back to the tower simulator that you took a look at and the radar room simulator that you took a look at, how is that whole interface working?

NAYLOR: Transitioning from 1940s radar to current-day satellite-based technology isn't cheap. The cost has been estimated at some $40 billion, to be shared by the government and the airlines. Congress this year agreed to spend some $4 billion over the next four years on NextGen. But the private sector remains wary, says Joshua Schank, president of the ENO Center, a transportation think tank.

JOSHUA SCHANK: The private sector is very risk-averse when it comes to making investments that they don't see an immediate return on, particularly the airline industry, which is an industry that has been suffering and really never made money its entire history. For them to go out on a limb and invest in a new technology with questionable benefits, it's just not going to happen.

NAYLOR: Still, progress is being made. The FAA and some of the airlines are testing new landing approaches to take advantage of the more efficient technology at a handful of airports, including Seattle-Tacoma and Atlanta's Hartsfield. And NextGen has enabled controllers to track helicopter traffic to and from the Gulf of Mexico's oil rigs for the first time.

Huerta says nobody really opposes modernizing the air traffic control system, but cautions it's going to be a long-term transformation. Brian Naylor, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.