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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Crazy Photo: Reporter Snaps Pic As Baseball Nearly Beans Her

Apr 29, 2013
Originally published on April 29, 2013 12:40 pm

When Fox Sun Sports reporter Kelly Nash was at Fenway Park in Boston on Saturday to cover the Houston Astros' game with the Red Sox, she decided to take a few "selfie" photos while atop the famous Green Monster in left field.

Below, batting practice was underway. So some balls were flying in her direction. Nash turned her back to the field, held her smartphone up and started snapping.

And when she looked at one of the photos she'd just taken, Nash says, she discovered she'd come much closer to being beaned than she'd realized.

She posted the image of a ball flying by behind her head. Her caption: "Most dangerous selfie ever. That happened."

"I laughed pretty hard when I saw such a surreal picture that I had no idea I took," she said later, according to Fox. "I thought, you have got to be kidding me, maybe there are really angels in the outfield." (She says she had a DVD copy of the movie Angels in the Outfield in her briefcase.)

For skeptics, there's this from NBC Sports:

"People who try to Photoshop fake ones like that never do such a good job. But this one is real, as the interplay with witnesses and others on her Twitter feed make clear."

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