Sports Commentary: Why Wimbledon Still Thrills

33 minutes ago
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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

More than 4 in 10 working Americans say their job affects their overall health, with stress being cited most often as having a negative impact.

That's according to a new survey about the workplace and health from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

While it may not sound so surprising that work affects health, when we looked more closely, we found one group was particularly affected by stress on the job: the disabled.

If you've stepped foot in a comic book store in the past few years, you'll have noticed a distinct shift. Superheroes, once almost entirely white men, have become more diverse.

There's been a biracial Spider-Man, a Muslim Ms. Marvel, and just last week, Marvel announced that the new Iron Man will be a teenage African-American girl.

Joining this lineup today is Kong Kenan, a Chinese boy who, as part of a reboot of the DC comics universe, is one of four characters taking up Superman's mantle.

On Tuesday, an international tribunal soundly rejected Beijing's extensive claims in the South China Sea, an area where China has been building islands and increasing its military activity.

The case before the international tribunal in the Hague was brought by the Philippines, challenging what's widely seen as a territorial grab by Beijing. The tribunal essentially agreed. Beijing immediately said the decision was null and void and that it would ignore it. There are concerns now that the tribunal's decision could inflame tensions between the U.S. and China.

The deaths last week of three African-American men in encounters with police, along with the killing of five Dallas officers by a black shooter, have left many African-American gun owners with conflicting feelings; those range from shock to anger and defiance. As the debate over gun control heats up, some African-Americans see firearms as critical to their safety, especially in times of racial tension.

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Clinton For Veep: Follow The Sources

Nov 8, 2011

Would President Obama swap Joe Biden for Hillary Clinton on his 2012 ticket? NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin is dubious. "Where this comes from I do not know," he declared in his Monday column dismissing the speculation about any plans to replace Biden.

One source Ken singled out was Bob Woodward of the Washington Post. Woodward told CNN last year that a Clinton-for-Biden scenario was worth taking seriously:

"It's on the table. And some of Hillary Clinton's advisers see it as a real possibility in 2012. President Obama needs some of the women, Latinos, retirees that she did so well with during the 2008 primaries and, so they switch jobs. Not out of the question."

Ken said Woodward's comments "were met with an unsurprising ton of eye-rolling in Washington." But if I learned anything during my own time working at the Post, Woodward's speculation was dependably backed up by reporting.

The best example involved a different running mate question during the 2000 campaign. Back then, Woodward was among the first, if not the only journalist to publicly and correctly predict that Texas Gov. George W. Bush would choose Dick Cheney as his vice presidential nominee.

Talk about "eye-rolling." The newspaper's political staff was a bit skeptical when Woodward floated the Cheney idea during a meeting. But Woodward repeated his prediction again soon after in a July 17 video interview for the Post's website:

"I also would not rule out Bush turning to the chairman of his selection committee — namely, Dick Cheney — and saying, 'I'd like you to do it.'"

Woodward listed some of the reasons Cheney might be the kind of person Bush was looking for. He wasn't quite ready to bet a dollar on it. "But 50 cents of my dollar bet is," Woodward said. A week later, that bet would have paid off.

It turned out Woodward's speculation was based on a solid source. In an email exchange about his Cheney hunch, the reporter and author alluded to a July 2000 conversation he and the future veep had during a rooftop Independence Day party at the Federal Reserve.

Cheney, who was heading Bush's vice presidential search at the time, described the scene in his recent memoir:

"Washington is a funny place when you're out of power, and that, added to the fact that we had a couple of grandchildren with us, meant that no one rushed to join our little group — except for Bob Woodward. The famed Washington Post reporter brought his plate over, sat down beside me, and after some preliminary small talk, proceeded to pump me for information about the VP search process and who the pick might be. His instincts were right — there was a big story here — but none of his speculation was focused on me, and I felt no need to broaden his horizons."

But apparently the conversation reset Woodward's thinking. "I suspected it would be someone like Cheney and later reasoned, who is most like Cheney? Well, Cheney, of course," he said on Monday.

The reporter doesn't sound any more likely to bet a buck on a Biden-Clinton swap than he was on the Cheney choice 11 years ago. But maybe another 50 cents?

"The key phrase here is 'would not not rule out,'" Woodward said about his Cheney prediction. "I would say the same about the Clinton for Biden possibility. Not necessarily likely (unless it happens) but not something to rule out."

Stencel was the political editor for the Washington Post's website during the 2000 campaign and is now managing editor for digital news at NPR.

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