"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

A Century-Old Grotto That Might Out-Glitter Vegas

Jun 22, 2012
Originally published on June 22, 2012 6:11 pm

The Midwest is known for its roadside attractions — world's largest ear of corn, heaviest ball of twine, biggest truck stop.

But it's also home to one of the largest collections of grottoes in the world. Most of these man-made caves were created by immigrant priests at the beginning of the 20th century. And the mother of them all — encrusted in $6 million worth of semiprecious stones — is in West Bend, Iowa.

This weekend, the Grotto of the Redemption turns 100.

With a population of 785 and the requisite one restaurant, one bar and one stoplight, West Bend looks like many small rural towns in Iowa, surrounded by farmland and grain bins.

But if you venture a block off the highway, you come upon a surreal sight: an entire city block filled with man-made concrete caves, every available surface plastered in glittering stones, rocks, petrified wood, even seashells.

The is the Grotto of the Redemption, and its overwhelming opulence tends to leave visitors like Shirley Raml a little tongue-tied.

"It's awesome" is all she can manage to sputter before giving up with a sigh.

Payton Smith, who works with the Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures in Madison, Wis., describes it as "a visual orgy" and "almost unreal."

He says that to talk about the grotto, you need to understand Father Paul Dobberstein, the man behind it.

"You can call them self-trained artists, outsider artists, visionary, things like that," Smith says. "But individuals like Paul Dobberstein, they're different because they built huge environments."

Dobberstein was a true renaissance man: a man of faith, a trained geologist, and in the end, a prolific and influential artist. The Midwest is home to three major grottoes and as many as 100 smaller works, some of them by Dobberstein, a German immigrant who was the local parish priest.

But the Grotto of the Redemption was his life's work.

Sandy Koolhaus is a guide at the grotto.

"He had a one-track mind; he wanted his grotto done," Koolhaus says. "That was his everything. Morning, noon and night, breakfast, lunch and dinner."

When Dobberstein got pneumonia, he prayed to the Virgin Mary: If he survived, he would build her a shrine. And thus the Grotto of the Redemption was born.

Koolhaus tells about his many trips to collect the rare stones and stalagmites that glitter in the sunlight. During the Depression, when he couldn't afford to travel, he made rocks himself, out of melted glass and crayons. As a result, he was able to work on the grotto throughout the Depression — and he kept at it for more than 40 years.

Just about everyone in town is connected to the grotto. Many remember Father Dobberstein personally; some even lent him a hand. Many remember when tourists flooded in to see him work.

While there are fewer visitors these days, thousands still come each year. Some are rock hounds, who come to see one of the largest collections of semiprecious stones anywhere.

And, there are visitors like Don Webster. For him, the trip is more like a pilgrimage.

"I just got cold chills all over, and when I've studied the history and all of the theology for five years in seminary, and then to come here and see this, it takes my breath away," he says.

The grotto is turning 100. And despite all its glitter, it's showing its age — the same environment that inspired Dobberstein is slowly eroding the grotto's rocks and stones.

Copyright 2013 Iowa Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.iowapublicradio.org.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. The Midwest is known for its roadside attractions. See the world's largest ear of corn, grab a soda at the largest truck stop. Well, you can add to that list the heartland's many grottos. Most of these manmade caves were created by immigrant priests at the beginning of the 20th century. One of the most impressive is in West Bend, Iowa. This weekend, it turns 100.

Iowa Public Radio's Sandhya Dirks paid a visit to the Grotto of the Redemption.

SANDHYA DIRKS, BYLINE: West Bend, Iowa: population, 785; the requisite one restaurant, one bar, one stoplight. It looks like many small rural towns here surrounded by farmland and grain bins. But if you venture a block off the highway, you come upon something almost surreal, an entire city block filled with man-made concrete caves. Now, imagine every available surface plastered in glittering stones, rocks, petrified wood, even seashells. This is the Grotto of the Redemption. And it tends to leave visitors, like Shirley Raml, a little tongue-tied.

SHIRLEY RAML: It's awesome. I don't - I...

(SOUNDBITE OF SIGH)

DIRKS: You're speechless.

RAML: Yeah.

PAYTON SMITH: When you're looking at $6 million worth of semiprecious stone, you know, cemented in, it's a visual orgy. It almost is unreal.

DIRKS: Payton Smith works with the Center for Upper Midwestern Cultures. He says to talk about the grotto, you need to understand Father Paul Dobberstein, the man behind it.

SMITH: You can call them self-trained artists, outsider artists, visionary, things like that, but individuals like Paul, they're different because they built huge environments.

DIRKS: Father Dobberstein was really a Renaissance man, a man of faith, a trained geologist and, in the end, a prolific and influential artist. The Midwest is home to the largest concentration of grottos in the world, including three major ones and maybe as many as 100 smaller works, some of them by Dobberstein. But the Grotto of the Redemption was quite literally his life's work.

SANDY KOOLHAUS: He was - had a one-track mind. He wanted his grotto done.

DIRKS: That was...

KOOLHAUS: That was it.

DIRKS: ...his everything.

KOOLHAUS: That was his everything: morning, noon, night, breakfast, lunch and dinner.

DIRKS: Sandy Koolhaus is a guide at the grotto. She tells tourists when Dobberstein got pneumonia, he prayed to the Virgin Mary. If he survived, he would build her a shrine. She tells about his many trips to collect rare stones and stalagmites that glitter in the sunlight. During the Depression, when he couldn't afford to travel, he made rocks himself out of melted glass and crayons.

KOOLHAUS: And because he was willing to make the rocks, he was able to work on the grotto throughout the entire Depression.

DIRKS: Across the street, three women are teasing Jane Hanselman for only taking the tour last week even though she's lived here for 70 years.

JANE HANSELMAN: My niece is a tour guide for one thing, and so I just wanted to heckle her.

(LAUGHTER)

HANSELMAN: But it turned out I didn't because it was a very good tour.

(LAUGHTER)

DIRKS: Sandy is your niece?

HANSELMAN: Yeah. She's my niece.

DIRKS: Just about everyone in town is connected to the grotto. Many remember Father Dobberstein personally. Some even lent him a hand. And they remember when tourists flooded in to see him work. While there are fewer visitors these days, thousands still come each year. Some are rock hounds who come to see what's thought to be the largest single collection of semiprecious stones in the world. Then there's Don Webster. For him, the visit is more like a pilgrimage.

DON WEBSTER: I just got cold chills all over. And when I've studied the history and all of the theology for five years in seminary and then to come here and see this, it takes my breath away.

DIRKS: The grotto is turning 100. And despite all its glitter, it's showing its age because the same environment that inspired Father Dobberstein is slowly eroding the rocks and stones here. For NPR News, I'm Sandhya Dirks. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.