Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Bikini Baristas And Sexist Sausages: Food Marketing Gone Wrong

Jun 28, 2013
Originally published on June 28, 2013 4:22 pm

In Seattle, the city that sired Starbucks, you don't have to travel more than a few steps to find a decent — nay, great — cup of joe. Java is the lifeblood of the city: Where other cities might offer walking tours of historic sites, in Seattle, "coffee crawls" take visitors to the city's best-loved coffeehouses.

The obsession extends well across the state: Even on the drive to Olympic National Park, miles and miles of rural, unpeopled landscape are broken every so often by tiny kiosks hawking fancy macchiato.

All of which makes for a cutthroat atmosphere for coffee vendors: It's not enough to simply make a decent cappuccino. Some find they need a shtick to stand out from the crowd.

And that, perhaps, explains one of the seamier sides of the region's caffeinated habit: bikini baristas. Think Hooters, but with coffee instead of "great" wings. Apparently, even sexism gets filtered through the area's favorite brew.

Yes, at some drive-through coffee stands, the baristas bare more than their espresso knowledge while whipping up your drink.

But at one such chain of stands, Java Juggs, it seems the services offered weren't limited to topping customers off with foam. As The Seattle Times reports, police raided several of the stands and their sister operation — Twin Peaks — this week on suspicion that they were a front for prostitution and other lewd conduct. As the paper reports:

"Police say that some of the baristas at Java Juggs were making big bucks, including one who reportedly earned $100,000 in tips last year. Customers would routinely pay $20 for a cup of coffee and a 'show' by scantily clad barista that ranged from flashing the customer to sex, according to the search warrant."

Sadly, Java Juggs has many competitors in Washington state (with groan-inducing names like Bikini Baristas and Natte Latte.) And this isn't the only bit of sexist food news of this week. Alas, from Germany comes another example: sexist sausages.

Edeka, a German supermarket chain, is apparently now marketing "his and her" sausages, the German news site The Local reports. The women's sausages, the site reports, "are half the size of their masculine counterparts and significantly more expensive"; they also feature a beefy, shirtless male on the packaging. (The men's version comes with an image of a seductively posed woman.)

German journalist and political scientist Antje Schrupp highlighted the ham-headed marketing move on her blog this week. Schrupp also reprinted an angry letter sent to the supermarket chain by journalist Susanne Enz, who denounced the packaging as a form of "dull sexism."

Dull — and depressing. At least not every attempt to use women to market food is so clumsy. Care for a spoonful of Liz Lemon, anybody?

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