NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Pages

Between Touchdowns And Triple Jumps, Politicians Are Popping Up On Sports TV

Jul 12, 2012
Originally published on July 13, 2012 11:10 am

Along with the highlights, the trade rumors and news of misbehaving athletes, viewers of ESPN's SportsCenter are about to get a bigger dose of politics.

The sports giant says it will sell commercial time to candidates in local markets now instead of just nationally. Executives are selling it as a good fit for politicians.

"Sports has become so culturally relevant, and the live nature of the programming has made what we happen to have at ESPN very attractive to the advertising community across all kinds of products," says Ed Erhardt, the network's president of sales. "And those concepts would be applicable to political candidates as well."

Local political ads won't just appear on the nightly highlights show SportsCenter; they'll also pop up on ESPN's college and NFL games this fall. Those games could prove irresistible to candidates looking to hit a wide swath of voters, especially traditionally hard-to-reach young white men.

"If you're looking for white males in battleground states, football is a very good way to reach them. Think about battleground states in the Midwest like an Ohio or a Wisconsin," says Ken Goldstein, president of the ad tracking firm Kantar Media CMAG. "What's it worth to be on an Ohio State-Wisconsin football game in the fall just before a presidential election? I think the answer is a lot."

ESPN isn't the only network that will be mixing sports and politics in the coming days. President Obama's campaign says it will spend $5.5 million on ads during NBC's Olympics coverage. And Restore Our Future, a superPAC that backs Republican candidate Mitt Romney, announced a $7 million Olympics ad buy.

The Obama campaign has also been advertising during baseball. One ad focusing on the candidates' stance on contraception and abortion ran during a recent Washington Nationals game, presumably aimed at female voters in the northern suburbs of Virginia, a swing state.

While selling a candidate when viewers are looking to escape into sports may seem counterintuitive, in practical terms it makes sense for candidates.

"Regular viewers of sports tend to be those types of voters who turn out in higher numbers than viewers of other types of genres," says Michael Franz, a government professor at Bowdoin College. "In the case of the Olympics, for example, not only will regular Americans who are not sports enthusiasts be watching but obviously sports enthusiasts will be watching closely, and that type of regular sports viewer is someone who regularly turns out to vote in high numbers."

Another advantage of sports programming: It's usually watched live, meaning viewers aren't able to fast-forward past a commercial (though they still can escape to the refrigerator or elsewhere).

But candidates might be advised not to run their standard attack ad during a game.

"If you have a theme to your advertising, it might involve an athlete, it might involve a sport, might involve competition. ... All of our research shows that those ads tend to perform better," says ESPN's Erhardt, who has found that in advertising during sports, context is key. "If the advertising that a political candidate would do on ESPN is thought out and is creatively relevant within that context, I do believe it will be more effective rather than it just being the same advertising that they're running everywhere.

With the upcoming blitz of political ads on sports programs, the phrase "here's the pitch" takes on a whole new meaning.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now, one way this hectic political season is playing out is on television, in particular, sports channels. The coming months will be heaven for armchair sports junkies - baseball, the Olympics, then college and pro football. And as NPR's Brian Naylor tells us, viewers can expect to see a lot more politics alongside the play by play.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: This is Sports Center.

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: Along with the highlights, the trade rumors, and news of misbehaving athletes, viewers of ESPN's Sports Center program are in store for a dose of politics, or at least political ads. The popular sports network says it will start selling some of its commercial time to candidates who wish to advertise in local markets rather than with cable's usual national audience.

Ed Erhardt, ESPN's president of sales, says his network is a good fit for politicians.

EDWARD ERHARDT. ESPN: Sports has become so culturally relevant and the live nature of the programming has made what we happen to have at ESPN very attractive to the advertising community across all kinds of products. And those concepts would be applicable to political candidates as well during this particular time.

NAYLOR: Along with Sports Center, political ads will also appear in the network's lineup of college and NFL football games starting this fall. Those games should prove irresistible to candidates looking to reach a wide swath of voters, especially traditionally hard to reach young white males, says Ken Goldstein, president of the ad tracking firm, Kantar Media Cmag.

KENNETH GOLDSTEIN: If you're looking for white males in battleground states, football's a very, very good way to reach them. You know, think about battleground states in the Midwest, like in Ohio or Wisconsin. What's it worth to be on an Ohio State-Wisconsin football game in the fall just before the presidential election? I think the answer is a lot.

NAYLOR: ESPN is not the only network that will be mixing sports and politics in the upcoming days. The summer Olympics will also be a popular venue. The Obama campaign has announced plans to spend $5.5 million on ads during NBC's Olympics coverage. And Restore Our Future, a superPAC that backs Republican Mitt Romney, announced a $7 million Olympics ad buy.

The Obama campaign has also been advertising during baseball. This ad ran during a recent Washington Nationals game, presumably aimed at female voters in the northern suburbs of Virginia, a swing state.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Every woman who believes decisions about our bodies and our health care should be our own is troubled Mitt Romney supports overturning Roe versus Wade. Romney...

NAYLOR: While trying to sell a candidate during a time when viewers are looking to escape into the world of sports may seem counterintuitive, in practical terms, it makes sense for candidates. Michael Franz is a professor of government at Bowdoin College.

MICHAEL FRANZ: Regular viewers of sports tend to be those types of voters who turn out in higher numbers than viewers of other types of genres. And so in the case of the Olympics, for example, not only will regular Americans who are not sports enthusiasts be watching, but obviously sports enthusiasts will be watching closely. And that type of regular sports viewer is someone who regularly turns out to vote in high numbers.

NAYLOR: Another advantage of sports programming, it's usually watched live, meaning viewers aren't able to fast forward past a commercial, assuming they remain in the room and aren't making a trip to the refrigerator or elsewhere. But candidates might be advised not to run their standard attack ads during a game. ESPN's Erhardt says his network has found that in advertising during sports, context is key.

ESPN: If you have a theme to your advertisement that might involve an athlete, might involve a sport, might involve competition, et cetera, all of our research shows that those ads tend to perform better. If the advertising that a political candidate would do on ESPN is thought out and is creatively relevant within that context, I do believe it will be more effective, rather than it just being the same advertisement they're running everywhere.

NAYLOR: So with the upcoming blitz of political ads on sports programs, the phrase here's the pitch takes on a whole new meaning. Brian Naylor, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.