The new British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her cabinet today.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AOL CEO Apologizes For Public Firing

Aug 14, 2013
Originally published on August 14, 2013 12:51 pm

After several days of brutal criticism and commentary about the brutal way he fired a man during a conference call, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is now apologizing.

"I am writing you to acknowledge the mistake I made last Friday during the Patch all-hands meeting when I publicly fired Abel Lenz," Armstrong says in an email to AOL employees, which Mashable has posted here.

Armstrong adds that:

"We talk a lot about accountability and I am accountable for the way I handled the situation, and at a human level it was unfair to Abel. I've communicated to him directly and apologized for the way the matter was handled at the meeting. ...

"On Friday I acted too quickly and I learned a tremendous lesson and I wanted you to hear that directly from me."

He doesn't indicate that Lenz has his job back.

In case you've missed the news, it was last Friday — during a meeting and conference call about AOL's plans to cut staff at the Patch local news websites — when Armstrong suddenly ordered Lenz to put down a camera and then said, "Abel, you're fired. Out."

Apparently, Armstrong didn't want the call to be recorded or his photo to be taken. He wrote in his email that "Abel had been told previously not to record a confidential meeting, and he repeated that behavior on Friday." There have also been reports that Armstrong wasn't pleased with Patch's recent redesign. Lenz was Patch's creative director.

The way Armstrong acted, though, "has to make everyone on the call question his ability to remain calm and poised in a difficult situation," outplacement executive James Challenger told CBS MoneyWatch.

After news media blogger Jim Romenesko posted the audio, word about what Armstrong had done went viral and spread to the cable news networks and other news outlets. Fast forward to about the 1:55 mark if you want to zero in on the moment when Armstrong fires Lenz.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.