NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Pages

'The Age Of Miracles' Considers Earth's Fragility

Jul 2, 2012

The Age of Miracles is literary fiction, but it spins out the same kind of "what if?" disaster plot that distinguishes many a classic sci-fi movie. Too bad the title The Day the Earth Stood Still was already taken, because it really would have been the perfect title for Thompson's novel.

Our main character here is named Julia and, though she's now in her 20s, most of her narration is retrospective, taking us back to her 11-year-old self — the year everyday life fell apart. At first, Julia tells us, nobody noticed "the extra time, bulging from the smooth edge of each day like a tumor blooming beneath skin." That so-called extra time is caused by the fact that the Earth's rotation is growing more and more sluggish. When scientific experts finally do go public to acknowledge the mysterious change, they call it "the slowing." Daytime stretches first by minutes, then hours, and, then, days; so, too, does nighttime. After "the slowing" is officially acknowledged, there's an immediate run on canned food and water, and people begin building underground survival shelters. Birds fall from the sky, and whales wash up on beaches — their navigation systems all messed up by the changes in gravity and temperature. Apocalyptic cults flourish, and a rift widens between those folks called "real timers," who stubbornly decide to live by the extended rhythms of sunrise and sunset, and the majority of Americans, who obey the president's orders to carry on in semi-denial and stick to the 24-hour clock. As Julia recalls, "We would fall out of sync with the sun almost immediately. Light would be unhooked from day, darkness unchained from night."

That's only a sampling of the believable climate change catastrophes that Walker conjures up. Although The Age of Miracles itself slows somewhat toward its very end, Walker mostly manages to keep the calamities coming. Just as inspired as her plot is Walker's decision to make the adolescent Julia her main narrator. Both the Earth's environment and young Julia are in the throes of seismic upheaval. You would expect that the most ominous words in this novel would be "the slowing," but they're not; the most ominous words — spoken by preteen Julia — are these: "[N]o force on Earth could slow the forward march of sixth grade. And so, in spite of everything, that year was also the year of the dance party."

Julia is not the kind of glossy girl who's comfortable strutting her stuff at these boy-girl parties: Instead, she's in the awkward "wise child" mode of beloved outsider characters like Scout and Holden Caulfield and The Member of the Wedding's Frankie Adams. She's sensitive enough to take note of the emotional "climate changes" around her: The greater drag of gravity, Julia says, "disrupted certain subtler trajectories: the tracks of friendships, for example, the paths toward and away from love." Sure, the natural world may be melting, but every bit as inexplicable and terrifying is the scene where Julia's longtime best girlfriend turns into a popular pod person and freezes her out at recess one day.

The best sci fi always contains a strong strain of melancholy: think, for instance, of the twilit ending of H.G. Wells' masterpiece, The Time Machine. Wells called his sci-fi stories "scientific romances," and that's an apt term for Walker's novel, as well. The Age of Miracles is a pensive page-turner that meditates on loss and the fragility of both our planetary and personal ecosystems.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Weather stories, as we've seen over the past week, are inherently gripping. Book critic Maureen Corrigan says debut novelist Karen Thompson Walker has written a doozy.

MAUREEN CORRIGAN: "The Age of Miracles" is literary fiction, but it spins out the same kind of what if? disaster plot that distinguishes many a classic sci-fi movie. Too bad the title "The Day the Earth Stood Still" was already taken, because it really would have been the perfect title for Thompson's novel.

Our main character here is named Julia and, though she's now in her 20s, most of her narration is retrospective, taking us back to her 11-year-old self, the year everyday life fell apart. At first, Julia tells us, nobody noticed the extra time, bulging from the smooth edge of each day like a tumor blooming beneath skin.

That so-called extra time is caused by the fact that the Earth's rotation is growing more and more sluggish. When scientific experts finally do go public to acknowledge the mysterious change, they call it the slowing. Daytime stretches first by minutes, then hours, and then days. So, too, does nighttime.

After the slowing is officially acknowledged, there's an immediate run on canned food and water, and people begin building underground survival shelters. Birds fall from the sky, and whales wash up on beaches, their GPS systems all messed up by the changes in gravity and temperature.

Apocalyptic cults flourish, and a rift widens between those folks called real-timers, who stubbornly decide to live by the extended rhythms of sunrise and sunset, and the majority of Americans, who obey the president's orders to carry on in semi-denial and stick to the 24-hour clock.

As Julia recalls: We would fall out of sync with the sun almost immediately. Light would be unhooked from day, darkness unchained from night. That's only a sampling of the believable climate change catastrophes that Walker conjures up. Although "The Age of Miracles" itself slows somewhat toward its very end, Walker mostly manages to keep the calamities coming.

Just as inspired as her plot is Walker's decision to make the adolescent Julia her main narrator. Both the Earth's environment and young Julia are in the throes of seismic upheaval.

You would expect that the most ominous words in this novel would be the slowing, but they're not; the most ominous words - spoken by preteen Julia - are these: No force on Earth could slow the forward march of sixth grade. And so, in spite of everything, that year was also the year of the dance party.

Julia is not the kind of glossy girl who's comfortable strutting her stuff at these boy-girl parties. Instead, she's in the awkward wise child mode of beloved outsider characters like Scout and Holden Caulfield and Frankie Adams in "The Member of the Wedding."

She's sensitive enough to take note of the emotional climate changes around her. The greater drag of gravity, Julia says, disrupted certain subtler trajectories; the tracks of friendships, for example, the paths toward and away from love. Sure, the natural world may be melting, but every bit as inexplicable and terrifying is the scene where Julia's longtime best girlfriend turns into a popular pod person and freezes her out at recess one day.

The best sci-fi always contains a strong strain of melancholy. Think, for instance, of the twilit ending of H.G. Wells' masterpiece, "The Time Machine." Wells called his sci-fi stories scientific romances, and that's an apt term for Walker's novel, as well. "The Age of Miracles" is a pensive page-turner that meditates on loss and the fragility of both our planetary and personal ecosystems.

DAVIES: Maureen Corrigan teaches literature at Georgetown University. She reviewed "The Age of Miracles" by Karen Thompson Walker.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVIES: You can join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @nprfreshair. And you can download podcasts of our show @freshair.npr.org. Terry Gross returns tomorrow. I'm Dave Davies. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.