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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

43 minutes ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

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67 Years Of Potato Chip Innovation, In 5 Animated GIFs

Apr 4, 2013
Originally published on July 24, 2015 1:48 pm

For more, watch our video: Secrets From A Potato Chip Factory.

Americans spend less on groceries than they did a few decades ago. That's partly because of new machines and technology that have made it much cheaper to produce food.

We went to the Herr's potato chip factory in Nottingham, Pa., to see some of this food-making technology in action. When Herr's first opened up in 1946, founder Jim Herr and his family made chips by hand. Here are three ways the process has changed over the years.

1. Unloading Potatoes

It used to take hours to unload a truck full of potatoes by hand. Ed Herr — Jim's son and the current president of the company — remembers dragging hundred-pound sacks into the factory. Today, the truck drives a semi-trailer full of potatoes onto a lift. The lift goes up.

And 50,000 pounds of potatoes come rolling out. The whole thing takes just 20 minutes.

2. Getting Rid Of Bad Chips

Herr's has been removing potato chips with brown or green spots for decades. Workers used to do it by hand. But now, they have the OptoSort. The OptoSort takes photos of the freshly fried chips, identifies the off-color ones, and then puffs of air shoot them off the line. The red arrow shows the rejects being blown off the line:

Good chips are flying by at the top of the frame; the rejects are getting blown onto the conveyor belt at the bottom of the frame. Here's a close-up of the action:

3. Packaging

The company used to pack chips into bags by hand. The picture below shows Mim Herr, Jim's wife and Ed's mom, packing chips. Ed says she would maybe make three bags a minute.

Today, a machine weighs and sorts chips into foil bags — at a rate of 100 bags a minute.

One final note: Ed Herr says workers whose jobs were replaced by machines (e.g., getting rid of green chips, hauling sacks of potatoes) were reassigned to other jobs, like driving trucks full of chips to stores.

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