Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri has released an audio message pledging loyalty to the new head of the Afghan Taliban, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, who was chosen recently to succeed Mullah Omar.

This year's El Niño is shaping up to be a whopper — potentially surpassing the one in 1997, which was the strongest on record, the National Weather Service says.

That could be good news for drought-stricken California, but not-so-good for places such as the Philippines and Indonesia, which typically experience below-normal rainfall or drought conditions during El Niños.

If you thought that professional video game competitions would be the one sport immune to a doping scandal, you'd be wrong.

Security forces in Myanmar have surrounded the headquarters of the ruling USDP and ousted its chief in the culmination of an intra-party feud less than three months before a general election.

Shwe Mann, the influential speaker of the parliament who has been considered a leading contender for the presidency, has been removed from his role as chairman of the Union Solidarity Development Party. Thein Sein, the party's president said to be behind his ouster, will take over Mann's position, according to a statement from the party.

The self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a truck bomb attack in Baghdad that has killed at least 67 people.

Reports of casualties vary. The 67 figure comes from The Associated Press, but Reuters says 76 are dead and al-Jazeera is reporting "at least 55."

NFL Football Hall of Famer and longtime sports broadcaster Frank Gifford died Sunday at his Connecticut home at age 84.

He "died suddenly this beautiful Sunday morning of natural causes," the family confirmed in a brief statement.

Receiver and running back Gifford attended the University of Southern California on a football scholarship before going pro. He played for the New York Giants in a career on the field that spanned 1952 to 1964. He made the Pro Bowl in seven of his 12 NFL seasons.

The Australian government is warning that Vegemite – the salty yeast-based spread that's an iconic staple of the national diet – is being purchased in bulk quantities to produce moonshine in rural indigenous communities where alcohol is banned.

Brewer's yeast is a key ingredient of the dark brown paste, which was first developed as a substitute for Marmite when the supply of the British-made spread in Australia was virtually cut off during World War I.

Typhoon Soudelor, fresh from causing devastation on Taiwan, has left a dozen dead and five missing in mainland China as it caused floods and mudslides even as it ground down to tropical storm status.

The storm made landfall in China's Fujian province late Saturday after causing six deaths in Taiwan and leaving hundreds of thousands there without electricity.

Japan today marked the 70 years since the dropping of the second of two U.S. atomic bombs that helped end World War II in the Pacific.

In the city of Nagasaki, where more than 70,000 people died in the bombing that came after even greater loss of life at the city of Hiroshima, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe restated his country's pledge never to allow nuclear weapons on Japanese soil.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders found himself involuntarily sidelined at a rally Saturday night in Seattle, as Black Lives Matter activists commandeered the microphone and refused to give it back.

Sanders had just begun to speak at the conclusion of a Social Security Works rally at Westlake Park when two women climbed on stage and took over the microphone. They demanded that the crowd hold Sanders "accountable."

Some in the crowd booed.

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