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5:19am

Sun June 28, 2015
Author Interviews

Raised By 5 Different Families, 7 Siblings Are Reunited In 'Bastards'

Originally published on Sun June 28, 2015 10:44 am

Courtest W.W. Norton & Company

Mary Anna King grew up in a housing project in southern New Jersey, with her older brother Jacob and struggling parents.

"When you're struggling financially and you're living in poverty ... it takes twice as much effort to do anything," she tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

Her parents went on to have five more kids, all girls, and despite her mother's best efforts to keep the family together, all five girls were ultimately given up for adoption.

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5:36pm

Sat June 27, 2015
Governing

For Families Of U.S. Hostages, New Policy May Bring New Hope

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Linda Boyle (left) and Lyn Coleman hold a photo of their children, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Caitlan Coleman, an American married to Canadian Joshua Boyle, was pregnant when the couple was abducted.
Bill Gorman AP

More than 80 Americans have been taken hostage abroad since Sept. 11, 2001. Currently, 30 Americans are being held around the world.

Until this week, the families of those hostages would have faced the threat of prosecution from the U.S. government for trying to pay a ransom to kidnappers.

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5:10pm

Sat June 27, 2015
Author Interviews

How To Win The Money Game: A Former NBA Star Shares Financial Advice

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 7:38 pm

Adonal Foyle (center) plays for the Orlando Magic against the Milwaukee Bucks in 2007.
Doug Benc Getty Images

According to Sports Illustrated, more than half of all NBA players are broke within five years of retirement. Most of the players come into professional sports totally unequipped to handle their own windfalls like cars, houses and fancy clothes.

Former NBA star Adonal Foyle is trying to help.

He offers financial advice for current and future professional athletes in his book Winning the Money Game: Lessons Learned from the Financial Fouls of Pro Athletes.

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5:08pm

Sat June 27, 2015
Book News & Features

Marvel's Half-Black, Half-Latino Spider-Man Is Going Mainstream

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Marvel has put half-African-American, half-Latino teen Miles Morales in the Spider-Man suit.
Courtesy of Marvel

Step aside, Peter Parker: There's a new Spider-Man joining the Marvel Universe.

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8:11am

Sat June 27, 2015
Author Interviews

Daniel Silva On 'Double-Edged Sword' Of Writing An Israeli Spy Protagonist

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 10:30 am

Lydia Thompson NPR

Another summer, another best-seller from novelist Daniel Silva. In The English Spy, the most famous woman in the world — a titled and gorgeous ex-member of the British royal family — is sunk on her yacht. To track down her killer, British Intelligence needs a little help — actually, a lot of help — from Gabriel Allon, an unassuming art restorer who is also, to those who have to know, a legendary and indispensable Israeli spy.

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8:11am

Sat June 27, 2015
Around the Nation

National Cathedral Should Not Be Stained With Confederate Flag, Dean Says

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 10:30 am

A glass window at Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., shows Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The dean of the cathedral has called for its removal.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The Confederate stars and bars have been taken down from flagpoles and store shelves all over the country this week. Calls for their removal follow the June 17 shooting of nine people at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C.

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2:03am

Wed June 24, 2015
Music Interviews

New Documentary Finds Nina Simone 'In Between The Black And White Keys'

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 6:34 pm

The documentary What Happened, Miss Simone? explores Nina Simone's rich and complicated life.
Courtesy of Peter Rodis/Netflix

Even those who didn't live through Nina Simone's heyday can recognize her songs, or at least her voice. Born Eunice Waymon, the passionate performer and activist died in 2003, and today her recordings still loom larger than the rest of her story.

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6:18pm

Sun June 21, 2015
Television

The Human Drama Of Hacking Fuels TV Thriller 'Mr. Robot'

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:13 am

USA's Mr. Robot tells the story of a cyber-security engineer and vigilant hacker (played by Rami Malek) who also suffers from anxiety.
Sarah Shatz USA Network

Cyborgs and androids are nowhere to be seen in the new USA show Mr. Robot. Instead, the drama is centered on a very human interior — the mind of Elliot, the unlikely hacker hero. From his first words — "Hello, friend" — his voice-over keeps audiences squarely inside his world.

"Elliot is sort of an internal, isolated guy who can't really interact with people socially, in real life, but online he can hack them and knows all the intimate, private details of them," Sam Esmail, the show's creator and executive producer, tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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5:09pm

Sun June 21, 2015
World

Snapshot Sleuthing Confirms Russian Military Presence In Ukraine

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 8:03 am

A soldier in the Russian army posed, rifle in hand, for a snapshot at a battlefield checkpoint. Simon Ostrovsky, at right, located the same spot in Vuhlehirsk, in Ukraine's Donetsk region.
VICE News

Reports of the Russian military helping pro-Russian separatist fighters in Ukraine are common — but can be hard to confirm. Russia denies that its soldiers are fighting in Ukraine.

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5:09pm

Sun June 21, 2015
Author Interviews

Beyond The 'Sometimes Sentimental' Story Of Filipino Migrants

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 6:18 pm

Lydia Thompson NPR

Mia Alvar was born in the Philippines, but as a small child her family moved to Bahrain. A few years later, they moved again, this time to New York.

The cities of her childhood are the settings in her debut collection of short stories, In The Country. The nine stories feature very different characters, in and outside of the Philippines, who are grappling with some form of exile or emigration.

"Part of the project," she tells NPR's Arun Rath, "was getting behind the official, sometimes sentimental, narrative about overseas Filipino workers."

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