Lynn Neary

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McEwan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

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3:43am

Fri May 29, 2015
Book News & Features

A Year Later, #WeNeedDiverseBooks Has Left Its Mark On BookCon

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 3:10 pm

In 2014, BookCon responded to the We Need Diverse Books campaign by inviting it to form its own panel. Pictured here (from left): I.W. Gregorio, Mike Jung, Matt de la Pena, Grace Lin and Jacqueline Woodson.
Courtesy of ReedPOP

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

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5:49pm

Thu May 28, 2015
Book News & Features

As Publishing Industry Courts China, Authors Speak Out Against Censorship

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 8:58 am

Protesters gathered on the steps of the New York Public Library on Wednesday to show support for silenced Chinese writers.
Frank Franklin II AP

Chinese writers and publishers are being celebrated this week in New York at BookExpo America — the industry's largest trade event in North America. Organizers of the event say China deserves a seat at the table because it is such a big and potentially lucrative market. But some authors and free speech advocates have seen this as an opportunity to shine light on censorship in China.

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7:58am

Sat May 16, 2015
Performing Arts

Amy Poehler On Vinyl Designed To Catch Eyes Along With Ears

Originally published on Sat May 16, 2015 11:23 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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3:40am

Tue May 12, 2015
The Salt

In 'Organic Life,' The Making Of America's First Certified Organic Restaurant

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 12:56 pm

Chef, cookbook author and owner of Washington, D.C.'s Restaurant Nora, Nora Pouillon, in the restaurant's garden.
Courtesy of Noras.com

When restaurateur Nora Pouillon moved to the United States from Austria in the 1960s, she was surprised by how hard it was to get really fresh food. Everything was packaged and processed. Pouillon set out to find the find the best ingredients possible to cook for her family and friends. She brought that same sensibility to her Restaurant Nora, which eventually became the first certified organic restaurant in the country.

Pouillon writes about her lifelong devotion to food in a new memoir, My Organic Life: How A Pioneering Chef Helped Shape The Way We Eat Today.

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5:37am

Sat April 18, 2015
Book News & Features

'Orhan's Inheritance' Is The Weight Of History

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 10:59 am

Emily Jan NPR

Next Friday, Armenians commemorate the events that took place 100 years ago, when the Ottoman Empire began forcibly deporting Armenians from their homeland, which lies within an area that is now Turkey. It was the beginning of a massacre that left more than one million Armenians dead. Armenians call it genocide; Turkey says the killing was not systematic, but part of widespread fighting at the time.

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5:01am

Tue March 31, 2015
Book News & Features

'Wolf Hall' On Stage And TV Means More Makeovers For Henry VIII's 'Pit Bull'

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 7:58 am

Actor Mark Rylance, seen here as Thomas Cromwell in Masterpiece's Wolf Hall, views Cromwell as a survivor who knows how to manipulate power to his advantage. "He has the mind of a chess player," Rylance says.
Giles Keyte Playground & Company Pictures for Masterpiece/BBC

Before Hilary Mantel decided to write about him, Thomas Cromwell, the man at the center of her popular award-winning novels, wasn't a heroic figure. History and popular culture mostly depicted him as a bad guy, able and willing to do the king's bidding, whether right or wrong.

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7:11am

Sat March 21, 2015
Book News & Features

'Hausfrau' Strips Down Its Modern-Day Madame Bovary

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 10:56 am

In her first novel, Hausfrau, poet Jill Alexander Essbaum has created a heroine who is not without precedent. Her name is Anna and she is, as we learn in the first sentence, "a good wife, mostly." That phrase, written with a poet's precision, contains a kernel of truth and a world of lies.

As a woman frustrated by the parameters of her own life, Essbaum's character has much in common with some literary heavyweights from the past.

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5:24pm

Mon March 9, 2015
Book News & Features

Straight To Audiobook: Authors Write Original Works Meant To Be Heard

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 10:57 am

Alexandru Petrea iStockphoto.com

In recent years while e-books were plowing their way through the publishing industry like a big noisy steam engine, audiobooks were chugging along in the background like the Little Engine That Could. These days, that sometimes overlooked segment of the book business is growing at a rapid pace and the industry is looking for new ways to catch listeners' ears.

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5:48pm

Fri February 13, 2015
Television

See What 'Saturday Night Live' Looks Like The Rest Of The Week

Originally published on Sat February 14, 2015 7:17 am

Roseanne Roseannadanna (Gilda Radner) with Jane Curtin in 1979.
Edie Baskin Taschen

When Saturday Night Live went on the air 40 years ago, few would have guessed how many of the cast members would go on to become household names. But you've probably never heard of Edie Baskin and Mary Ellen Matthews. They're the official photographers on Saturday Night Live and their combined careers have spanned the life of the show. A collection of their work has been published to coincide with this year's anniversary broadcast on Sunday.

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6:42pm

Wed February 4, 2015
Book News & Features

Harper Lee's Friend Says Author Is Hard Of Hearing, Sound Of Mind

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 7:35 am

Author Harper Lee attends a ceremony in Montgomery, Ala., in 2007.
Rob Carr AP

News that a second novel by Harper Lee will be published next July has thrilled fans of her first novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, but it has also been met with some skepticism and concern. Lee has been involved in several legal skirmishes and controversies in recent years, raising questions about whether she is being taken advantage of in her old age.

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