Geoff Brumfiel

Science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel's reports on physics, space, and all things nuclear can be heard across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk. He became a full-time correspondent in March of 2013.

Prior to NPR, Geoff was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

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4:33pm

Thu July 30, 2015
World

Debris Found In The Indian Ocean May Be From Missing Malaysia Airlines Jet

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 6:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:05am

Wed July 29, 2015
All Tech Considered

Beam Me Up? Teleporting Is Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn't

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:00 pm

Star Trek's Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk never even lose pocket change when they use a transporter to get from TV's Starship Enterprise to distant worlds. What gives?
Paramount Television/The Kobal Collection

"I have a hard time saying this with a straight face, but I will: You can teleport a single atom from one place to another," says Chris Monroe, a biophysicist at the University of Maryland.

His lab's setup in a university basement looks nothing like the slick transporters that rearrange atoms and send them someplace else on Star Trek. Instead, a couple million dollars' worth of lasers, mirrors and lenses lay sprawled across a 20-foot table.

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4:18pm

Fri July 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Dark Pluto Bares Its Heart

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 5:14 pm

Scientists with NASA's mission to Pluto revealed stunning new images of the dwarf planet on Friday. Researchers say the pictures suggest an icy world complete with glaciers and "snow" that falls through a wispy atmosphere.

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5:53pm

Thu July 23, 2015
Space

NASA Announces Discovery Of Earth-Like Planet Around Distant Star

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:23pm

Mon July 20, 2015
Science

Russian Billionaire Donates $100 Million In Search For E.T.

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 6:37 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Today, a Russian billionaire investor announced he's giving a portion of his wealth to the search for extraterrestrial life. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports.

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3:42pm

Wed July 15, 2015
The Two-Way

Strange Worlds At The Edge Of Our Solar System Finally Come Into Focus

New details of Pluto's largest moon, Charon, are revealed in this image from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager.
NASA

Scientists have unveiled the best photos of Pluto and its moons that humanity is likely to see for at least a generation. These images were taken Tuesday by NASA's New Horizons space probe as it hurtled past Pluto at more than 30,000 miles per hour.

Since its discovery in 1930, Pluto has revealed itself to be an oddball world. It's smaller than our own moon, and it orbits at an angle relative to the plane of the solar system. Because of its size and distance, even the Hubble Space Telescope could only make it out as a brown smudge, billions of miles away.

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4:58pm

Tue July 14, 2015
Space

NASA Spacecraft Flies Past Pluto After 10-Year Journey

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 12:38 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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2:48pm

Mon July 13, 2015
The Two-Way

Planet Or Not, Icy Pluto To Finally Get Its Day In The Sun

Originally published on Mon July 13, 2015 8:30 pm

Technicians prepped the New Horizons spacecraft on Nov. 4, 2005, at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Fired into space in 2006, the probe is scheduled to finally get close to Pluto on Tuesday.
John Raoux AP

Alice Bowman oversees daily operations for NASA's mission to Pluto. Her language is peppered with technical terms — like "astronomical units" and "aim points."

But there's one piece of scientific nomenclature you won't hear coming from Bowman's lips: dwarf planet.

"Pluto is a planet," she says. "And that's the way I will always think of it."

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3:45am

Mon July 6, 2015
The Two-Way

Pluto-Bound Spacecraft Nears Its Quarry

Originally published on Tue July 7, 2015 7:58 am

NASA's New Horizons mission will be the first ever to visit Pluto and its moons. This artist's conception shows the probe as it passes the dwarf planet.
JHUAPL/SwRI

It has taken nearly a decade and 3 billion miles to get there, but scientists are about to get their first look at Pluto.

The New Horizons spacecraft is closing fast on the tiny world once thought to be at the edge of our solar system. On Tuesday the probe will begin an intensive nine-day scientific study of Pluto and its moons.

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1:37pm

Thu July 2, 2015
The Two-Way

Russian Rocket Poised For Crucial Supply Run To Space Station

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 6:45 pm

On Friday, a Russian Soyuz rocket will send an unmanned cargo ship with more than 3 tons of food, water and fuel for astronauts aboard the International Space Station.
Russian Federal Space Agency

The stakes are high for a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station, after a string of failures has left the orbiting outpost running somewhat low on supplies.

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