Frank James

Frank James joined NPR News in April 2009 to launch the blog, "The Two-Way," with co-blogger Mark Memmott.

"The Two-Way" is the place where NPR.org gives readers breaking news and analysis — and engages users in conversations ("two-ways") about the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

James came to NPR from the Chicago Tribune, where he worked for 20 years. In 2006, James created "The Swamp," the paper's successful politics and policy news blog whose readership climbed to a peak of 3 million page-views a month.

Before that, James covered homeland security, technology and privacy and economics in the Tribune's Washington Bureau. He also reported for the Tribune from South Africa and covered politics and higher education.

James also reported for The Wall Street Journal for nearly 10 years.

James received a bachelor of arts degree in English from Dickinson College and now serves on its board of trustees.

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5:36pm

Fri April 5, 2013
It's All Politics

Obama Riles His Own Party With Social Security Offer

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:11 pm

President Obama prepares to depart San Francisco on Thursday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Few things indicate a president no longer needs to worry about re-election more than his willingness to ignite an intraparty firestorm.

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5:07pm

Wed April 3, 2013
It's All Politics

Sen. Landrieu's First GOP Rival Sets In Motion Key 2014 Contest

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 5:44 pm

Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La. (right), poses with his family and House Speaker John Boehner at the start of the new Congress, on Jan. 3. On Wednesday, Cassidy announced that he would challenge Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu in 2014.
Cliff Owen AP

Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, considered among the most vulnerable of the Senate's red-state Democrats facing 2014 re-election, now has at least one potential Republican opponent, Rep. Bill Cassidy, whose congressional district includes Baton Rouge.

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5:38pm

Tue April 2, 2013
It's All Politics

Reality Often Rivals Fiction In Political Corruption Scandals

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 6:22 pm

U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara outlines corruption charges against several New York politicians on Tuesday.
Richard Drew AP

The federal criminal complaint against New York politicians arrested after an FBI sting was a reminder of how often real-life political scandals can read like the imaginings of Hollywood screenwriters.

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4:29pm

Mon April 1, 2013
It's All Politics

Immigration Overhaul Inches Forward, But Big Hurdles Remain

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., says talk of a bipartisan agreement among eight key senators working on immigration law is "premature."
Susan Walsh AP

It's still far too early to know whether Congress will actually be able to achieve a comprehensive overhaul to the nation's immigration laws. All that's certain at this stage is that lawmakers on both sides of the partisan divide, and in both chambers, continue to act as though they think they can.

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10:07am

Tue March 26, 2013
It's All Politics

NPR's Twitter Coverage Of Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Arguments

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 10:26 am

People line up in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday before the justices hear arguments in the first of two same-sex marriage cases.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

NPR is covering the historic oral arguments before the Supreme Court in a number of ways, including on Twitter.

You can follow our Twitter coverage at @nprpolitics.

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10:12am

Sat March 23, 2013
It's All Politics

A Hint Of Bipartisanship On This Obamacare Tax?

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat, was joined by Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch in taking steps to try to stop an Obamacare medical device tax.
Jim Mone AP

Anyone looking for a glimmer of bipartisanship in Washington might want to pay attention to the medical device tax that is part of Obamacare. It took a notable, if largely symbolic, hit this week from the left and the right.

The 2.3-percent excise tax on devices ranging from MRI machines to pacemakers to stethoscopes was meant to raise $20 billion over 10 years to help pay for extending health care coverage to the uninsured under the Affordable Care Act.

But so far it has raised more ire than revenue.

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5:00pm

Wed March 20, 2013
It's All Politics

Administration Still Fighting For Assault Weapons Ban, Biden Says

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 12:00 pm

Vice President Biden at a December 2012 meeting of police chiefs on gun control, held in Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Vice President Joe Biden told All Things Considered co-host Melissa Block in an interview Wednesday that he and the Obama administration plan to continue to fight for a ban on assault weapons to be included in a larger bill in Congress.

That despite signs that such a ban doesn't have enough support, even from members of Biden's own party, to make it through the Democratic-controlled Senate.

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3:45pm

Wed March 20, 2013
It's All Politics

Pew Poll: For Many Who've Changed Same-Sex Marriage Views, It's Personal

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 4:09 pm

Frank Capley (left) and Joe Alfano protest the San Francisco county clerk's denial of marriage licenses to same-sex couples on Feb. 14.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Sen. Rob Portman, an Ohio conservative Republican who recently said he now supports same-sex marriage because he has a gay son, evidently has plenty of company.

A new poll from the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press suggests that many Americans have changed their minds — going from opposing to supporting same-sex marriage — because they personally know someone who is gay.

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5:23pm

Tue March 19, 2013
It's All Politics

Scholar Outlines The Long, Rocky Road Of GOP Outreach Efforts

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 6:04 pm

Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., speaks on Oct. 22, 1977, in Atlanta. A political scientist says the GOP has suffered some missteps in its outreach efforts to certain voters since at least the time of Dole.
AP

One of the most interesting observations we've seen regarding the Republican National Committee's latest effort to win the hearts and minds of minorities, women and young voters was to be found on a blog that promotes a

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2:19pm

Mon March 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Republicans' Secret To Success? Sound And Act More Like Democrats

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 7:17 pm

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Monday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

If Republicans hope to recapture the White House in the foreseeable future, they basically need to sound and campaign more like Democrats.

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