Amy Kiley

The new British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her cabinet today.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Amy joined WUWM in January 2011 as an Announcer. She began her career interning for WBEZ-Chicago Public Radio and NPR affiliate WGVU in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She also served as News Director of her college station WNUR at Northwestern University.

Prior to joining WUWM, Amy served as an announcer and reporter for Northeast Indiana Public Radio. She also worked as a full-time bilingual writer and photographer for a Spanish- and English-language publication near Chicago. As a freelance journalist, she contributed several reports to WUWM’s Lake Effect program. Amy has won several journalism awards from The Hearst Foundations and Society of Professional Journalists.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. Amy also holds a master’s degree in music from Westminster Choir College and a master’s degree in liturgy from St. Joseph’s College.

When most people drive to church on Sunday, it's to sit for an hour-long service on uncomfortable wooden pews. Not at the Daytona Beach Drive In Christian Church in Florida.

As church attendance continues to decline in the United States, some parishes are doing what they can to draw congregants: embracing social media, loosening dress codes and even altering service times for big sporting events. At this church, people park in rows on the grass facing an altar on the balcony of an old drive-in theater. To hear the service, they switch on their radios.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

We're going to take a look this morning at how the economic downturn has hurt the places where we live - cities, counties, towns - and the ways that people are trying fight through.

MONTAGNE: We begin in Wisconsin, where, as in much of the country, municipalities are running out of sources of cash. Residents complain taxes are too high, then wince when services are cut.