3:46am

Tue April 23, 2013
Author Interviews

For TV Networks, Stiff Competition To Be 'Top Of The Morning'

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:05 pm

Grafissimo iStockphoto.com

Last spring, what NBC fondly refers to as "America's First Family" went through a very public divorce. Ann Curry, who spent more than a decade as a news anchor on the Today show and less than a year as a host, was unexpectedly axed. "For all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker," Curry said with emotion in her last morning broadcast, "I'm sorry I couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. But man, I did try."

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3:44am

Tue April 23, 2013
The Salt

Journey Of A Specialty Coffee Bean, From Cherry To Cup

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 4:12 pm

Coffee beans are raked to dry in the sun in western Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

When we wanted to know how the growth of the specialty coffee movement is influencing the lives of farmers, we took a trip to the mountainous region of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.

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3:42am

Tue April 23, 2013
The Changing Lives Of Women

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:05 pm

Lucy Wang and Derek Wei represent the new modern Chinese bride and groom. With a lack of women in China, Wei had to pay more than $10,000 in a "bride price" to attract Wang to marry him.
Sim Chi Yin for NPR

Women hold up half the sky, China's Chairman Mao famously said. But in China, the one-child policy and the traditional preference for boys mean that 117 boys are born for every 100 baby girls. By one estimate, this means there could be 24 million Chinese men unable to find wives by the end of the decade.

As China's economy booms, the marriage market has become just that: a market, with new demands by women for apartments and cars.

But are women really benefiting from their scarcity?

Let's Make A Deal

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7:27pm

Mon April 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Father Saves Boy From Alligator Attack, With A Stranger's Help

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:05 pm

A Fish and Wildlife Service team caught and killed an alligator after the animal attacked a 6-year-old boy Friday. The boy survived with only incidental wounds.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A 6-year-old boy's day off from school Friday left him with a vivid story to tell his classmates, after he was seized — and eventually released — by an alligator in South Florida. The attack occurred at a wildlife refuge near Boynton Beach, Fla., where Joseph Welch had taken his son, Joey, for a canoe ride.

As Welch, a native of Rhode Island who now lives in Pompano Beach, says in a Morning Edition interview airing Tuesday, his idea had been to do "something new and different."

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7:19pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Law

Justices Weigh Speech Rights For Groups Getting U.S. Funds

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:52 pm

People line up to enter the Supreme Court on Monday for arguments.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court grappled with a tough First Amendment issue on Monday that pits congressional priorities against free speech rights. At issue: what speech limitations may be placed on private groups that receive federal grant money to fight HIV/AIDS abroad.

The justices' questions revealed a court closely divided, and not along the usual liberal/conservative lines.

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7:16pm

Mon April 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Half Of Guantanamo Detainees Now On Hunger Strike

We told you last week about an increase in the number of prisoners on hunger strike at Guantanamo Bay. This week, that number has risen further – to cover half of all inmates at the U.S. detention facility; also, 1 in 10 inmates is now being force fed.

Eighty-four of the 166 prisoners at the camp are on hunger strike, the U.S. military said Sunday; 16 of them are being force fed through tubes.

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6:14pm

Mon April 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Anthony Weiner Makes Twitter Comeback

U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner announces his resignation from Congress on June 16, 2011, in New York. The disgraced former congressman is reportedly considering a run for New York mayor.
Richard Drew AP

Anthony Weiner is back — on Twitter, that is.

The disgraced politician who resigned his congressional seat after sending sexual images to female followers on the social networking site — and then lying about it — rejoined Twitter on Monday.

As of 5:50 p.m. ET, Weiner had 4,322 followers.

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6:12pm

Mon April 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Former Teacher Charged For Child Porn Detained In Nicaragua

Eric Justin Toth.
FBI

Nicaraguan authorities say they have detained Eric Justin Toth, a former teacher at a Washington, D.C., private school accused of producing child pornography.

Back in April 2012, Toth took Osama bin Laden's place on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list.

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5:39pm

Mon April 22, 2013
All Tech Considered

Google Execs Talk Privacy, Security In 'The New Digital Age'

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:35 pm

iStockphoto.com

Imagine a world with machines that wash, press and dress you on the way to work and vacations via hologram visits to exotic beaches. In his new book, The New Digital Age, Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt does just that — but it's no gee-whiz Jetsons fantasy.

Schmidt partners up with Jared Cohen, a foreign policy counterterrorist specialist poached from the State Department now working for Google Ideas. Together they forecast a raft of new innovations and corresponding threats that will arise for dictatorships, techno revolutionaries, terrorists and you.

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5:37pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston Lockdown 'Extraordinary' But Prudent, Experts Say

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:52 pm

A sign on I-93 alerts motorists that Boston is under a "shelter in place" order Friday.
Elise Amendola AP

Local officials have defended the decision to essentially lock down the city of Boston on Friday while law enforcement searched for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing.

Residents were told to remain indoors during the hunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who survived an early morning shootout with police in the suburb of Watertown during which his brother, Tamerlan, was killed.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced the decision to lock down Watertown and the surrounding areas, including Boston, at a dawn news conference Friday.

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