4:26pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Planet Money

Has The Cupcake Bubble Finally Popped?

Back in 2010, our own Jacob Goldstein called the cupcake craze a "bubble of historic proportions." He called it too early.

The following year, Crumbs Bake Shop went public, and Jacob began to doubt himself.

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4:16pm

Tue April 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Allan Arbus, Who Played Psychiatrist On TV's 'M.A.S.H.,' Dies At 95

Allan Arbus on the left, with fellow M.A.S.H. stars Loretta Swit, Mike Farrell, Burt Metcalfe, Alan Alda, Kellye Nakahara Wallet and Wayne Rogers at an awards ceremony in 2009.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Allan Arbus, best known for his recurring role as psychiatrist Sidney Freedman on the hit television comedy M.A.S.H., has died at age 95, his family says.

Arbus died Friday due to congestive heart failure, his daughter said in a statement. His second wife, Mariclare Costello Arbus, told Reuters that her husband "just got weaker and weaker and was at home with his daughter and me" when he passed away.

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4:16pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Politics

Mont. Senator Baucus To Retire After 36 Years In Congress

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And one other piece of news from the Senate, Democrat Max Baucus is retiring. The powerful chair of the Senate Finance Committee has represented Montana since 1978. Baucus is the sixth Senate Democrat to announce he won't run for reelection in 2014. NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith has that story.

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4:16pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Business

Investors Pessimistic About Apple's Growth Potential

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. This afternoon, investors watched even more closely than usual as Apple released its quarterly earnings. The numbers beat Wall Street's gloomy expectations. But for the first time in a decade, Apple's profits fell from the same period a year earlier. NPR technology correspondent Steve Henn joins us from Silicon Valley to talk about today's results. Hey there, Steve.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: Hi.

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4:16pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Business

Natural Gas Gives Maine Paper Plant A Competitive Edge

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We've reported on how cheap natural gas is revolutionizing the energy industry. It's plentiful, thanks to the drilling technique known as fracking. Well, that's also changing American manufacturing. Factories are turning to natural gas to replace oil and even biomass sources like woodchips. And here's an example, a paper mill in East Millinocket, Maine.

Jay field of Maine Public Radio has the story.

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4:11pm

Tue April 23, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Noticing: How To Take A Walk In The Woods

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:41 pm

Oli Scarff Getty Images

When was the last time you met someone who didn't tell you they were "crazy busy"? It seems like everyone these days is overwhelmed. From the endless tasks of maintaining home and family life to the ever-accelerating pressures of the endlessly troubled, endlessly competitive economy, it seems that all of us are running ragged.

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4:07pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Piano Jazz With Jon Weber

Allan Harris On Piano Jazz

Allan Harris.
Ayano Hisa Courtesy of the artist

On this episode of Piano Jazz With Jon Weber, velvet-voiced singer, guitarist and composer Allan Harris joins Weber for a set of standards and a few tunes from the Harris-penned musical, Cross That River.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:54pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston Search Shines Spotlight On Surveillance Cameras

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:04 pm

An investigator inspects the area near a surveillance camera on the roof of the Lord & Taylor store near the Boston Marathon finish line on Thursday. That camera provided the first glimpse of the men who allegedly planted the bombs.
Julio Cortez AP

Footage from surveillance cameras along the Boston Marathon route gave the FBI early clues about the bombing suspects. And prosecutors say they'll use some of those images to try to prove their criminal case against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. But the proliferation of cameras in America's big cities is raising some tricky questions about the balance between security and privacy.

It was pictures of two brothers taken by a camera outside the Lord & Taylor department store that provided the first glimpse of the men who allegedly bombed the Boston Marathon.

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2:58pm

Tue April 23, 2013
The Salt

Want To Forage In Your City? There's A Map For That

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 11:25 am

Falling Fruit tells you where you can pick peaches and other foods free for the taking around the world.
istockphoto.com

If you really love your peaches and want to shake a tree, there's a map to help you find one. That goes for veggies, nuts, berries and hundreds of other edible plant species, too.

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2:52pm

Tue April 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Breaking Tradition, Cooper Union Will Charge Undergrads Tuition

The new Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art academic building is seen in Manhattan's Cooper Square in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Citing financial strain, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art announced that beginning in the fall of 2014, it would begin charging its undergraduate students tuition.

The college is one of the few institutions that doesn't charge students tuition.

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