8:27am

Wed July 31, 2013
The Two-Way

U.S. Teenager Is Youngest Ever To Pass Britain's Bar Exams

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:23 pm

At 18 years old, American Gabrielle Turnquest has become the youngest person to pass Britain's Bar exams, qualifying her as a barrister. Turnquest is a native of Windermere, Fla. She studied for the exams at Britain's University of Law.

From London, NPR's Larry Miller reports for our Newscast unit:

"The average age to gain a barrister's qualification is 27. Turnquest says she's honored to be the youngest person to become a British barrister. Due to her parent's heritage, she is also called to the Bahamas bar.

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8:04am

Wed July 31, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Genetically Modified Organisms: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

An Argentine farmer stands by his field of trangenic soy, designed for resistance to drought and salinity.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Rarely is the relationship between science and everyone so direct as it is in the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), in particular foods. It is one thing to turn on your plasma TV or talk on your iPhone; it is an entirely different proposition to knowingly ingest something that has been modified in the lab.

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7:52am

Wed July 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Student Left In DEA Cell For Days Reaches $4.1 Million Settlement

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 11:43 am

Daniel Chong spent more than four days in a federal holding cell without food or water.
K. C. Alfred U-T San Diego

Daniel Chong, the San Diego college student who spent more than four days in a Drug Enforcement Administration holding cell without food or water, has reached a $4.1 million settlement with the U.S. government. The DEA apologized to Chong last year and instituted a review of its practices.

The ordeal, in which Chong was forgotten in a cell after being taken in during a drug raid, caused Chong to become increasingly desperate. At one point, he said last year, he drank his own urine to survive.

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7:09am

Wed July 31, 2013
Shots - Health News

Last Person To Get Smallpox Dedicated His Life To Ending Polio

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:13 pm

Ali Maow Maalin said he avoided getting the smallpox vaccine as a young man because he was afraid of needles. He didn't want others to make the same mistake with polio.
Courtesy of the World Health Organization

So far, the human race has eliminated just one disease in history: smallpox. But it's on the cusp of adding a second virus — polio — to that list.

One special man in Somalia was at the battlefront of both eradication efforts. He died last week of a sudden illness at age 59.

Ali Maow Maalin was the last member of the general public — worldwide — to catch smallpox. And he spent the past decade working to end polio in Somalia.

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7:09am

Wed July 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Booksellers Irate Over Obama's Amazon Visit

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:04am

Wed July 31, 2013
Book Reviews

The Scope Of The 20th Century In Sweeping, Sprawling 'Joy'

There's nothing soothing or easygoing about this massive novel, which was first published obscurely in Italy in the late 1990s. Goliarda Sapienza, a novelist and actress who worked with the likes of Pasolini and Visconti, spent more than a decade writing The Art of Joy, and on balance, she must have felt it a massive disappointment, given that no publisher wanted to go near its chaotic, handwritten blend of ambisexuality, religion, feminism, and politics.

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7:03am

Wed July 31, 2013
The Two-Way

As Sentencing Phase Begins, Manning Could Face Decades In Prison

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:57 am

Former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning, found guilty of espionage and theft Tuesday, could face a lengthy prison sentence. A penalty hearing for Manning begins today.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

As the sentencing hearing for former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning begins today, he faces the possibility of spending many decades in prison. Manning was found guilty Tuesday of 19 counts for giving thousands of classified U.S. documents to WikiLeaks.

Manning, 25, was acquitted of aiding the enemy, the most serious charge against him, which would have put him in jeopardy of a life sentence. He was found guilty of other serious charges, from theft to espionage, for his role in the largest leak of U.S. secrets in history.

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6:27am

Wed July 31, 2013
Politics

House Expected To Vote On Student Loan Deal

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with hope for a student loan dean.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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5:37am

Wed July 31, 2013
Politics

Obama Offers 'Grand Bargain' On Corporate Taxes

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama is offering Congress what he describes as a grand bargain on corporate taxes. He laid out the terms in Chattanooga, Tennessee yesterday on the latest stop of his national economic speaking tour.

NPR's Ari Shapiro was on the trip.

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5:37am

Wed July 31, 2013
Politics

2016 May Seem Just Around The Corner For Political Rivals

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

With a public battle between two likely Republican presidential contenders, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, and a private meeting between possible Democratic rivals Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden, it feels like 2016 is just around the corner. The two parties are already aligning themselves for a presidential race that's still three years away.

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