5:36am

Tue August 6, 2013
Sports

Major League Baseball Works To Win Fans' Trust

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So now the challenge for Major League Baseball: Winning back the trust of fans. The suspensions themselves were a start but there is a wrinkle because, as we've heard, Alex Rodriguez is appealing his 211-game ban. It means the narrative in baseball will continue to be about suspicions rather than the play on the field.

Joining us now to talk about the league and its efforts is NPR's Mike Pesca. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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5:16am

Tue August 6, 2013
Business

Jeff Bezos To Buy 'Washington Post' From Graham Family

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. This morning, The Washington Post is in its own headlines. The Graham family, which controlled the Post for eight decades, is selling the flagship paper. Here's Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, in a Post-TV video talking about the sale.

(SOUNDBITE OF POST-TV VIDEO)

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5:02am

Tue August 6, 2013
Art & Design

Art In Context: Venice Biennale Looks Past Pop Culture

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:56 am

The Angolan exhibit consists of tall stacks of large photographic posters by artist Edson Chagas. The country, which is exhibiting at Venice for the first time, won the Golden Lion award for best national pavilion.
Courtesy of www.beyondentrophy.com

Every two years for over a century, lovers of contemporary art convene in Venice for the oldest and largest noncommercial art exhibition in the world.

The Venice Biennale has none of the glitz and conspicuous consumption of art auctions in London and New York. Instead, it's a dizzying and eclectic array of sights by both celebrity artists and total unknowns.

This year's works are not just paintings, sculptures and installations, but also performances, videos and music.

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5:02am

Tue August 6, 2013
Business

Bezos Tells 'Post' Employees He Shares Paper's Values

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

The world of newspapers was rocked Monday by news that Jeff Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon.com, is buying The Washington Post for $250 million. Bezos' purchase of the paper will bring to an end its association with the Graham family, which bought the Post in 1933.

5:02am

Tue August 6, 2013
Business

General Motors Lowers Sticker Price Of Chevy Volt

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:59 am

The company is hoping the move will increase sales. The 2014 model of the plug-in car will now cost about $35,000 — more than 12 percent less than last year's model. Ford and Nissan have already reduced the prices on their electric cars.

5:02am

Tue August 6, 2013
Business

GM Looks To China To Boost Car Sales

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

General Motors is selling a lot of cars in China. The company set a sales record there in July.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports China is in the front line in the battle for automotive global dominance.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: In China this year, forecasters predict nearly 20 million cars will be sold. In the U.S., the bet is we'll sell about 15 and a half million.

Mike Wall is with IHS Automotive.

MILE WALL: Yeah, you really can't overstate the importance of China in the overall global automotive landscape.

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5:02am

Tue August 6, 2013
Business

Study: Glass Ceiling True For Female White Collar Criminals

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:04 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Today's Last Word In Business is criminal glass ceiling. A new study suggests that female white collar crooks face the same barriers as their law-abiding counterparts in the corporate world.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A team of researchers from Penn State studied the involvement of women in recent corporate fraud cases. It found women held inferior positions in criminal conspiracies, and profited significantly less from their misdeeds.

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3:49am

Tue August 6, 2013
Around the Nation

With Budgets Tight, Small Towns Go Without Courthouses

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

In the small town of Coalinga, Calif., on the corner of 6th and Elm streets, the Fresno County Superior Court's old courthouse is still. Inside, veteran police Lt. Darren Blevins gestures inside an empty courtroom.

"In the past, when we actually had court in here, over on this wall here was the seating for the inmates or the people that were held in custody," he says.

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Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them.

3:42am

Tue August 6, 2013
Around the Nation

Dredging South Carolina's Rivers For Long-Forgotten Timber

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 12:56 pm

Louis Marcell and Adam Jones prepare to search for old logs, known as sinker wood, on the bottom of Ashley River near Charleston, S.C. They use sonar and a book of old train lines to find the timber, some of which has been preserved in the mud since the 1800s.
Noam Eshel

On the Ashley River, a few miles south of Charleston, S.C., the water is murky and the marsh grass high. A three-man logging crew is cruising on a 24-foot pontoon boat. It's low tide and logs are poking out everywhere.

Hewitt Emerson, owner of the Charleston-based reclaimed wood company Heartwood South, is in charge. He's going to an old saw mill site, but won't say exactly where. He's heading to Blackbeard's Creek, he says, as in pirate Blackbeard — the early 18th century scourge of the seas.

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