WVAS Local News

Another Inmate Stabbed to Death

20 hours ago

   Another state inmate has been killed in violence at an Alabama prison. A Department of Corrections statement says 36-year-old DeMarko  Carlisle was stabbed to death during an altercation at Elmore Correctional Facility on Sunday. The agency has a suspect, but officials aren't releasing that prisoner's name. They say the motive isn't known. Carlisle was serving a life sentence after being convicted of robbery in Jefferson County in 1999. Carlisle is the second inmate killed at Elmore prison in 10 days. Grant Mickens was stabbed to death in the prison on Feb. 16.

The public is invited to the annual Jewish Food Festival; it will be held in Montgomery on Sunday.  Festival goers will be able to sample an assortment of Jewish food and shop in the "Treasure Market."  Rabbi Elliot Stevens of the Kahl Montgomery Temple Beth Or says events like the festival serve as a community outreach tool.  The free event will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Kahl Montgomery Temple Beth Or.  

   The crash report involving a Montgomery Police officer has been made available to the media. WVAS News received a copy of the report from the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency. The February 17 crash happened at the corner of Woodley Road and Spring Valley. An unmarked police car collided with another car, critically injuring the officer, identified as Carlos Taylor and also injuring the other driver, now identified as Mae Francis Williams of Montgomery.

Montgomery Proclaims March 2 Claudette Colvin Day

Feb 22, 2017

   Many people think of Rosa Parks as the woman who sparked the Montgomery bus boycott by refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in 1955. But 15 year old Claudette Colvin had actually done the same thing months earlier. Last night, Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange issued a proclamation declaring March 2 as Claudette Colvin Day in the city. District 3 councilman Tracy Larkin says it’s good to see the civil rights pioneer getting the recognition she deserves.

Governor to Create Grocery Tax Task Force

Feb 21, 2017

   Governor Robert Bentley has scheduled an afternoon press conference to announce the formation of a Grocery Tax Task Force. Bentley had said in his State of the State address this month that he wanted to examine removing the state sales tax from groceries. Democratic Representative John Knight of Montgomery has brought many bills over the years to accomplish that. He says Alabama should have removed the sales tax from food a long time ago. Knight was a guest on the WVAS 90.7 Perspectives program last week.

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When he addresses a joint session of Congress Tuesday night, President Trump is expected to outline some of his plans for rebuilding the nation's crumbling infrastructure.

And he will likely reiterate his commitment to "buy American and hire American," as he repeated often during the campaign and since taking office last month.

But what exactly does that mean for state departments of transportation and the contractors who build transportation projects?

Ross Confirmed As Commerce Secretary

3 hours ago

Billionaire investor Wilbur Ross was confirmed as President Trump's secretary of commerce Monday night by a vote of 72 to 27 in the U.S. Senate.

Ross will divest from the private equity firm he founded, WL Ross & Co., as part of his ethics agreement upon entering government service. He will retain other financial interests but has pledged not to take any action as commerce secretary that would benefit a company in which he holds a stake.

It was, to be blunt, sex day at the Supreme Court. The justices heard two cases, both involving men who had been punished for having consensual sex with a minor. In one case, a 21-year-old legal resident of the U.S. was ordered deported after he pleaded no contest to having sex with his 16-year-old girlfriend. That would not be a crime in 43 states or under federal law, but it was enough to get him deported for having committed an "aggravated felony" in California.

A Minnesota police officer accused of fatally shooting Philando Castile in a St. Paul suburb last July pleaded not guilty to second-degree manslaughter and two other charges.

St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez entered his plea in a brief hearing in Ramsey County district court.

The private company SpaceX has announced that it plans to send two passengers on a mission beyond the moon in late 2018.

If the mission goes forward, it would be the "first time humans have traveled beyond low Earth orbit since the days of Apollo," as NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce told our Newscast unit.

The two private citizens approached the company about the idea and have already paid a sizable deposit, CEO Elon Musk told reporters in a conference call. These private individuals will also bear the cost of the mission.

It's been five years since the death of Trayvon Martin — and the outrage that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement.

Martin — 17 years old, black and unarmed — was shot by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions pledged to devote federal resources to combat violent crime and to shore up morale across the nation's police departments, on Monday in his first on-the-record briefing as the top U.S. law enforcement officer.

When it comes to climate change, we often think of the cars we drive and the energy we use in our homes and offices. They are, after all, some of the biggest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. But what about the toast you ate for breakfast this morning?

A new study published Monday in Nature Plants breaks down the environmental cost of producing a loaf of bread, from wheat field to bakery. It finds that the bulk of the associated greenhouse gas emissions come from just one of the many steps that go into making that loaf: farming.

This post has been updated

The Department of Justice is reversing the federal government's position in an important voting rights case, involving a Texas voter ID law. The switch was not unexpected following the election of Donald Trump and confirmation of Jeff Sessions as Attorney General. Both Trump and Sessions claim voter fraud is a major problem and have backed voter ID laws.

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