WVAS Local News

   The Alabama State University Presidential Search Committee has announced a series of meetings with the finalists for university president. The candidates will meet with various groups at scheduled times throughout the day on Thursday starting at 8am and ending at 4:30pm. The candidates have been identified as Dr. Tony Atwater, Dr. Willie Larkin, Dr. Robert Mock and Dr. Quinton Ross. They will meet with the ASU Board of Trustees, the search committee, faculty/staff, students and alumni, and community members. The four finalists will also be given a tour of the campus. 

Alabama Unemployment Rate Drops in July

Aug 18, 2017

 Alabama's unemployment rate has fallen to 4.5 percent. A news release from the state says the jobless rate dipped one-tenth of a percent in July from June. That puts the current rate well below the unemployment rate of one year ago, when it was 5.8 percent. Alabama's jobless rate remains worse than the national rate, which has fallen to a 16-year low of 4.3 percent. But a statement from Gov. Kay Ivey says there are fewer unemployed people in Alabama than there have been in a decade. The July rate represents about 96,251 unemployed persons in Alabama, down from 100,187 in June.

The city of Birmingham and its mayor are being sued by Alabama's attorney general for obscuring a Confederate monument in a downtown park. Steve Marshall, in a statement, said "The city of Birmingham does not have the right to violate a new law protecting such markers and leaves my office with no choice but to file suit." Legislators passed a law earlier this year prohibiting the removal of historical structures including rebel memorials. Birmingham Mayor William Bell had ordered the city's 52-foot-tall Confederate obelisk in Linn Park Memorial covered with wooden panels.

Hyles Files: Not Listening

Aug 16, 2017

Strange and Moore Headed to September Runoff

Aug 16, 2017

Sen. Luther Strange and former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore are headed to a Republican primary runoff to fill the U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The two men, who represent different factions within the Alabama Republican Party, will face off in a Sept. 26 runoff. Strange was appointed to the Senate seat in February by then governor Robert Bentley. He was unable to escape a runoff despite being buoyed by an endorsement by President Donald Trump. Moore harnessed his support among evangelical voters to secure a spot in the runoff.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Trump led an incendiary rally at which he ripped at cultural divides, played to white grievance, defended himself by stretching the truth or leaving out key facts, attacked members of his own party and the media, played the victim and threatened apocalyptic political consequences — all the while doing so by ignoring political norms and sensitivities.

The only thing that's surprising is if you're surprised by it.

You can swipe. You can scroll. But New Yorkers will no longer be able to flip through The Village Voice. This week, the legendary alternative weekly announced that it's ending its free paper version.

In a press release distributed Tuesday, the publication said it plans to maintain its digital platform and continue to host events, but will no longer be printing paper copies. The Voice had been in print for more than six decades, and recently had a distribution of some 120,000 copies each week.

As the debate rages over what role Confederate monuments do — and should — play in commemorating U.S. history, Jennifer Allen says we can learn a lot from Germany.

Allen is an assistant professor of German history at Yale University, and she specializes in something called memory politics.

At a campaign rally in Phoenix on Tuesday, President Trump made news by slamming Republican senators, praising controversial former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and blasting the news media.

He also defended his initial, controversial remarks on recent violent protests in Charlottesville, Va. But in doing so, he left out the parts of the remarks that inflamed people's tempers the most, like his comment that there was violence "on many sides."

It's a summer evening on the French Atlantic island of Noirmoutier. As the sun shimmers on the rustling marsh grasses, Hervé Zarka rakes in sea salt from shallow pools. He uses a simoussi, a 10-foot pole tipped with a flat board. Salt has been harvested this way since at least the seventh century, when Benedictine monks dug the canals that bring seawater into this marshland.

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