Sports

7:48am

Thu December 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Baseball Plans To Ban Home Plate Collisions; Good Idea?

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 10:34 am

Pete Rose of the National League barreled into American League catcher Ray Fosse at the 1970 All-Star Game in Cincinnati. It's one of the most famous home plate collisions in Major League Baseball history.
AP

It's one of baseball's "most traditional and most violent plays," as NPR's Tom Goldman says.

Starting as soon as next season, though, Major League Baseball will move to ban intentional collisions at home plate involving runners trying to score and catchers trying to tag them out.

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6:07pm

Wed December 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Some Young Athletes May Be More Vulnerable To Hits To The Head

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 3:31 pm

Dartmouth defenders sandwich a New Hampshire wide receiver during a game in Durham, N.H., in 2009.
Josh Gibney AP

Concussions have deservedly gotten most of the attention in efforts to reduce the risk of head injuries in sports.

But scientists increasingly think that hits too small to cause concussions also affect the brain, and that those effects add up. And it looks like some athletes may be more vulnerable than others.

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4:58am

Wed December 11, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Should Character Count In Sports Awards?

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 10:10 am

Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston reacts during the ACC Championship game on Saturday at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, N.C.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

The Grammy nominations are in, and the talk now is of what actors will be chosen for the Academy Awards, but not once have I heard anyone suggest that any of the singers or actors may not be nominated because of some character deficiency.

Likewise, when it comes to awards in theater or television or dance or literature, I don't ever recall any candidate losing out because of a personal flaw.

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5:12pm

Tue December 10, 2013
Sports

To Get Olympic Snow, Machines Give Nature A Nudge

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 12:30 pm

A skier glides past a snow-making machine pumping out snow in Weston, Mass., in 2010.
Bill Sikes AP

In Russia, organizers of the 2014 Winter Olympics have called on dozens of shamans to pray for snow. But the centerpiece of the Olympic snow strategy is man-made: a massive system that features more than 550 snow-making machines.

Sochi, Russia, which is hosting the Olympics, is a resort town on the relatively warm Black Sea. There are beaches and palm trees. The Alpine events will be held on a mountain just 30 minutes away, where last February it was raining, not snowing.

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12:39pm

Mon December 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Baseball's Torre, La Russa, Cox Add Another Title: Hall Of Famer

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 2:27 pm

Hall Of Fame Managers: The Atlanta Braves' Bobby Cox (from left), the St. Louis Cardinals' Tony La Russa, and the New York Yankees' Joe Torre.
AP

Their paths repeatedly crossed on the way to the World Series. And now retired managers Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and Bobby Cox are headed to the same place: the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The Hall's Expansion Era committee announced its selection Monday.

Together, the trio won eight World Series titles and led teams that were perennial threats to play in October. They account for a combined 7,558 victories.

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8:18am

Mon December 9, 2013
Sports

Broncos' Prater Kicks Record 64-Yard Field Goal

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Anybody who grew up watching football has seen video of Tom Dempsey's historic field goal. In 1970, the New Orleans Saint kicked a field goal from a record 63 yards to win a game. He did it though he was born with no toes on his right foot. The record stood for decades, sometimes equaled never exceeded, until Sunday. Denver's Matt Prater kicked one from 64 yards, though it was not decisive since his team won by 23 points.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:58am

Sun December 8, 2013
Sports

Just How Unfair Is The U.S.'s World Cup Draw?

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

What's the best way to pick a sport's ultimate champion? Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca about the fickle nature of competitions, from the World Cup to the NFL playoffs to college football playoffs.

5:33pm

Sat December 7, 2013
The New And The Next

An 'Accidental Activist,' And England's World Cup Hope

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 3:47 pm

Michael Regan Getty Images

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Watson tells NPR's Arun Rath about about a rising star in soccer who could turn things around for England in the World Cup, and a Bahraini woman who calls herself an "accidental activist." He also shares a clip from an Ozy interview with President Bill Clinton regarding Nelson Mandela's legacy.

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8:05am

Sat December 7, 2013
Africa

Nelson Mandela, The Sports Fan

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Nelson Mandela often was quoted as saying that sport has the power to change the world, it has the power to inspire, but rugby in South Africa has traditionally been a sport played by whites. Most black South Africans saw it as a pass time of the ruling elite. The year after Nelson Mandela became the first black president of South Africa, his country hosted the Rugby World Cup. This was 1995.

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8:05am

Sat December 7, 2013
Sports

Florida, Ohio, Auburn Battle In Bowl Championship Series

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 11:39 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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