Sports

4:36pm

Wed July 11, 2012
Sports

'I'll Have Another' Had Injuries Long Before Belmont

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:33 pm

Melissa Block talks with Joe Drape of The New York Times about his coverage of horse racing. He says the Triple Crown contender "I'll Have Another" had prior medical problems long before it was forced to drop out of the Belmont Stakes.

8:32am

Wed July 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Holy Cow! Family Finds Baseball Card Collection That May Fetch $3 Million

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:33 pm

Two of the most valuable cards in the collection: Ty Cobb (left) and Honus "Hans" Wagner.
Heritage Auctions

"My grandfather stuck it in the attic a hundred years ago and here it is now, a blessing to his grandchildren."

A blessing for sure.

As the Toledo Blade reports, when Karl Kissner and his cousins were clearing out his grandfather's home in Defiance, Ohio, on Feb. 29 they came across a box of very rare and very valuable baseball cards.

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5:39am

Wed July 11, 2012
Food

Phillies' Ballpark Offers Best Vegetarian Delights

They may not be having a great season on the baseball diamond, but the Philadelphia Phillies are in first place with the group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. PETA says Citizens Bank Park has the best vegetarian choices.

5:04am

Wed July 11, 2012
Sports

National League Wins Baseball's All-Star Game 8-0

Major League Baseball's 83rd All-Star Game wrapped up Tuesday night in Kansas City, Missouri. The National League trounced the American league in an 8-0 blowout, with impressive performances by some San Francisco Giants. Melky Cabrera of the Giants hit the game's only home run and took home the MVP Award.

3:23am

Wed July 11, 2012
London 2012: The Summer Olympics

Women's Field Hockey Aims To End Olympic Drought

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:45 am

Paige Selenski (right) of the United States fights for the ball against two Mexican opponents in a women's field hockey match at last October's Pan American Games in Mexico.
Dario Lopez-Mills AP

As one of the world's most popular sports, field hockey produces celebrities in Argentina, the Netherlands and Australia. But the sport is relatively obscure in the United States, where members of the women's national team receive a small monthly stipend and their notoriety comes from outside the country.

Later this month, the group heads to London, where it will try to earn the first American medal in the sport in 28 years.

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10:03pm

Tue July 10, 2012
Sweetness And Light

Going To The Game: The Price Is Wrong?

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 4:45 am

Andy Murray returns a shot during the men's final match at Wimbledon. A pair of tickets for the match went for £32,000 (about $50,000).
Paul Gilham Getty Images

Sports is more ubiquitous than ever on television. And sports is almost the only thing that's left, live, on TV. NBC Universal is even going to let Americans see the Olympics live this year.

Nevertheless, despite TV's charm, last week as Andy Murray, Great Britain's homeboy, drew closer to making the Wimbledon final, the word was that tickets for actual Centre Court seats would be scalped for up to £32,000 a pair. If you're not hanging around the currency exchange market, that comes to something like $50,000. For two tickets. To a game.

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6:00am

Tue July 10, 2012
Sports

Sports Tax Man Advises Athletes

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Turning, now, to professional sports. It's the off season for basketball and hockey and teams are wheeling and dealing, making trades, hoping to land star players. The athletes want the best deal too, and some of these very young millionaires clearly need advice.

NPR's Kevin Leahy consulted an accountant who calls himself the Sports Tax Man.

KEVIN LEAHY, BYLINE: Last week, point guard Steve Nash was on the market. Nash is Canadian, beloved in his home country. And the Toronto Raptors wanted him badly.

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3:17am

Tue July 10, 2012
Asia

China's Post-Olympic Woe: How To Fill An Empty Nest

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 11:31 pm

Fireworks light the night sky above the National Stadium, known as the Bird's Nest, during the closing ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. The stadium is largely empty these days.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

As the opening date for the London Olympics nears, Beijing's acclaimed Olympic venues are saddled with high maintenance costs and are struggling to get by. And the most famous, the Bird's Nest stadium, has been repudiated by its own creator, dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei.

Even the state-run government mouthpiece, the China Daily, worries that Beijing's iconic structures risk becoming "white elephants."

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4:11pm

Mon July 9, 2012
Sports

For R.A. Dickey, Knuckleballs Are Personal

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 11:32 pm

New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey delivers his signature pitch, with its unusual grip, against the Arizona Diamondbacks on May 6. He's the only knuckleballer in the major leagues, and the pitch has earned him a 12-1 record so far this season.
Kathy Willens AP

R.A. Dickey's career as a major league pitcher has been as unpredictable as his signature pitch, the knuckleball.

And on Tuesday night, the New York Mets' 37-year-old phenomenon will hit a new pinnacle: the pitching mound at baseball's All-Star Game.

He won't be starting for the National League — manager Tony La Russa chose Matt Cain of the San Francisco Giants for that honor. But the manager says says Dickey will pitch.

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4:55am

Mon July 9, 2012
Sports

Federer Picks Up 7th Wimbledon Title

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 6:11 am

Roger Federer now shares the Wimbledon men's singles record with Pete Sampras and William Renshaw. Andy Murray had hoped to be the first Briton to win the Wimbledon title in 76 years. Linda Wertheimer talks to Doug Robson, who covered Wimbledon for USA Today, about the tournament.

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