Science

12:11pm

Fri December 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

Angelina Didn't Help Educate People About Breast Cancer Risk

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 4:47 pm

A celebrity's efforts to educate the public about health risk may have very limited effects.
Evan Agostini AP

Remember when Angelina Jolie decided to have a double mastectomy to reduce her risk of breast cancer? The Hollywood star revealed her experience in The New York Times in May.

Her story got a lot of people talking about preventive mastectomies. But it didn't do much to increase people's understanding of breast cancer risk, a study found.

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11:04am

Fri December 20, 2013
The Salt

They're Back! Chesapeake Oysters Return To Menus After Rebound

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 12:44 pm

A plate of Sweet Jesus oysters grown in Chesapeake Bay by Hollywood Oyster Co. in Hollywood, Md.
Katy Adams Courtesy Clyde's Restaurant Group

The history of the Chesapeake Bay oyster hasn't always been a pure one. So you could forgive a chef for being skeptical about the big bivalve comeback being staged in D.C. and the surrounding area this winter as oyster season gets underway.

But many mid-Atlantic chefs are actually cheering. That's because a major public-private effort to re-establish the oyster as a quality local food product — as well as a weapon against water pollution — seems to be working.

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6:27am

Fri December 20, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

One Man. One Cat. Multiplied

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 11:08 am

Courtesy of Mike Holmes

We start with a man called Mike and a cat called Ella. Two creatures.

Nothing odd about them, except that Mike has a beard and Ella is a touch chunky. Otherwise, they could be any cat and guy. Except ...

When you think about it, no one is ordinary. You could put a totally bland cat-and-guy couple in front of a hundred people, ask them to look, and each one would see a very different pair, different in a thousand subtle ways, because everybody looks at everything with different eyes.

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5:10am

Fri December 20, 2013
Brain Candy

Do Crossword Puzzles Really Stave Off Dementia?

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. Play along here: The subject of our next story is nine letters long. It's a type of word puzzle. Answers go horizontally and vertically in this grid of squares. I've probably given it away, haven't I? Yes, it's a crossword. And tomorrow, the venerable crossword puzzle turns 100 years old. In its first century, the game has gained legions of fans around the world and a reputation for staving off dementia. NPR's Adam Cole takes a look at the history and the hype.

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8:34am

Thu December 19, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Animal Rescues: An End-Of-Year Celebration

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 3:09 pm

Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

3:00am

Thu December 19, 2013
The Salt

This Stanford Ph.D. Became A Fruit Picker To Feed California's Hungry

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 10:16 am

Sarah Ramirez runs an organization that brings excess produce to the hungry. Here, she gleans apples from a front yard.
Scott Anger KQED

By some estimates, we Americans throw away about 40 percent of our food, from the cabbage that's wilting in our refrigerators, to the fruit that's falling off the orange tree in our neighbor's backyard.

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8:18pm

Wed December 18, 2013
Shots - Health News

Mixing It Up 50,000 Years Ago — Who Slept With Whom?

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 1:39 pm

Research excavations like these in Siberia's Denisova Cave are yielding clues to the mating choices of early hominids.
Bence Viola Nature

In a remote cave in Siberia, scientists have found a 50,000-year-old bone from a toe that tells a story about life — and love — among some of the earliest humans.

They did it by analyzing DNA from that bone.

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5:15pm

Wed December 18, 2013
Animals

Study: Cats May Have First Cuddled Up With People 5,300 Years Ago

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 6:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The human love affair with cats has a long history. But just how long has always been a mystery. That's because little was known about how and when cats were domesticated. Now, scientists say they've uncovered new clues in a trail of evidence going back some 5,300 years in a small village in China. Joining us is Fiona Marshall, an archaeologist at Washington University in St. Louis, and co-author of a study on cat domestication. Welcome to the program.

FIONA MARSHALL: Thank you very much. Delighted to talk about cats.

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2:56pm

Wed December 18, 2013
The Salt

The Man Who Duped Millionaires Into Paying Big Bucks For Fake Wine

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 4:32 pm

iStockphoto

He was the man with "the nose of a blood hound," as one wine critic once put it.

Rudy Kurniawan was once the toast of the fine-wine world, renowned for his ability to find some of the rarest — and priciest — wines in the world.

He was also, prosecutors alleged, a fraud who duped some of the country's wealthiest wine purchasers with counterfeit bottles of wine that he manufactured in his home laboratory.

And on Wednesday, a Manhattan jury agreed, finding Kurniawan guilty of fraud in connection with selling counterfeit wines and of defrauding a finance company.

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9:37am

Wed December 18, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Why We Need A Science Capable Of Explaining Itself

We think that life came from non-life, from the increasing complexity of chemical reactions between biomolecules present on the primordial Earth. But what about the universe? How did it come to be if there was nothing before?
iStockphoto

Given the time of the year, it's hard not to go back to some of our perennial questions about beginnings; in our case here at 13.7, I'm talking about the beginning of nothing less than everything, the origin of the universe.

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