Science

1:50pm

Wed June 17, 2015
The Salt

To Tackle Food Waste, Big Grocery Chain Will Sell Produce Rejects

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 10:45 am

Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices.
Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

It's easy to blame someone else for food waste. If this is really a $2.6 trillion issue, as the United Nations estimates, then who's in charge of fixing it?

Turns out, we the eaters play a big role here.

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1:03pm

Wed June 17, 2015
The Two-Way

NASA Satellites Show World's Thirst For Groundwater

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 6:25 pm

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, or GRACE, used a pair of satellites to measure water use in the world's aquifers.
NASA

New data from NASA's GRACE satellites show that many of the world's biggest aquifers are being sucked dry at a rate far greater than they are being replenished. Although scientists don't know how much water is left, they hope their findings will serve as a "red flag" for regions that may be overusing water.

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8:43am

Wed June 17, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

After Long Slumber, Philae Says Hi To The World

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 9:17 am

An artist impression shows Philae on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
ESA/ATG medialab AP

In a technological feat that moved the world, last November the European Space Agency landed the small probe Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, which is cruising at some 100,000 miles per hour toward the sun. Excitement turned to high drama when the landing put the probe away from the sun's rays and, thus, from its energy source.

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9:35pm

Tue June 16, 2015
Shots - Health News

Updated Training Of Birth Control Counselors Boosts Use Of IUDs

When health care providers have the latest information on various birth control methods, research suggests, more of their patients who use birth control choose a long-acting reversible method, like the IUD.
iStockphoto

Just over half of all pregnancies in America are unplanned.

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12:53pm

Tue June 16, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Why The Pope's Stand On Climate Change Matters

Originally published on Tue June 16, 2015 2:43 pm

Marco Campagna iStockphoto

Things are about to get really interesting in the long-stalled public discussion on climate change.

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5:07am

Tue June 16, 2015
Research News

Disagreeable Teens Fail To Understand Their Blind Spots, Research Reveals

Originally published on Tue June 16, 2015 7:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:30pm

Mon June 15, 2015
U.S.

Endangered Species Protections At Center Of Drought Debate

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 2:23 pm

The sun sets over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta near Rio Vista, Calif., in 2013. The delta is the largest West Coast estuary and a source of conflict over the state's water.
Robert Galbraith Reuters/Landov

Travel up and down California farm country, the Central Valley, and you hardly hear people lamenting the lack of rain or how dry this past winter was. What you hear, from the agriculture industry and many local and national politicians, are sentiments like those expressed by Rep. Devin Nunes:

"Well, what I always like to say is that this is a man-made drought created by government," the Central Valley Republican says.

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5:36pm

Mon June 15, 2015
The Salt

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 7:50 pm

Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod.
Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

In the ocean off of Massachusetts, an unlikely alliance of scientists and fishermen is on a quest. They're looking for mating codfish. The goal is not only to revive a depleted fish population but to save an endangered fishing community as well.

Cod were once so plentiful in New England waters that people used to say you could almost walk across their backs. Cod fueled a huge fishing industry. But now they're scarce, mostly from overfishing.

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3:03pm

Mon June 15, 2015
Science

Instead Of Replacing Missing Body Parts, Moon Jellies Recycle

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 6:39 pm

Upon injury, juvenile jellyfish reorganize their bodies to regain symmetry.
Courtesy Michael Abrams, Ty Basinger, and Christopher Frick, California Institute of Technology/PNAS

Moon jellies have an unusual self-repair strategy, scientists have learned. If one of these young jellies loses some limbs, it simply rearranges what's left until its body is once again symmetrical.

"We were not expecting to see that," says Michael Abrams, a graduate student in biology at the California Institute of Technology.

All creatures have tricks to heal themselves. If you get a cut, your skin will form a scar. And some sea creatures, like starfish and sea cucumbers, can regenerate lost body parts.

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6:37am

Mon June 15, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Privileged Primates And The Mothers Who Mock Them

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 10:12 am

iStockphoto

I confess: As a Ph.D.-carrying mother of two and student of human behavior, I couldn't resist reading Primates of Park Avenue, the provocative memoir about motherhood on New York City's Upper East Side, released this month.

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