Science

7:03am

Thu June 18, 2015
Shots - Health News

When Should Surgeons Stop Operating?

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 11:44 am

A program based at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore offers a two-day series of assessments for older surgeons, evaluating "physical and cognitive" function.
iStockphoto

Increased fatigue, forgetfulness, and reduced eyesight — these are some of the declines that can come with aging.

Certain professions keep a close watch for these sorts of changes, in hopes of protecting the public. And some jobs even have a firm age cutoff: Airline pilots are required to retire at 65, for example, and some firefighters must step down by 57. But there are no nationwide age-related cutoffs, required assessments or guidelines to make sure doctors can do their jobs safely.

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6:03pm

Wed June 17, 2015
The Two-Way

Worms Know What's Up — And Now Scientists Know Why

Researchers say that inside the head of the worm C. elegans, an antenna-like structure at the tip of the AFD neuron (highlighted in green) is the first identified sensor for Earth's magnetic field.
Andrés Vidal-Gadea

In what researchers say is a first, they've discovered the neuron in worms that detects Earth's magnetic field. Animals have been known to sense the magnetic field; a new study identifies the microscopic, antenna-shaped sensor that helps worms orient themselves underground.

The sensory neuron that the worm C. elegans uses to migrate up or down through the soil could be similar to what many other animals use, according to the team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin.

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5:46pm

Wed June 17, 2015
Environment

Gambler-Turned-Conservationist Devotes Fortune To Florida Nature Preserve

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 7:22 pm

M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States.
Matt Ozug NPR

You might think you know what frogs sound like — until, that is, you hear the symphony of amphibians that fills the muggy night air at Nokuse Plantation, a nature preserve in the Florida Panhandle.

There, about 100 miles east of Pensacola, a man named M.C. Davis has done something extraordinary: He has bought up tens of thousands of acres in the Florida sandhills and turned them into a unique, private preserve.

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4:05pm

Wed June 17, 2015
Environment

Leaked Encyclical Highlights Growing Resistance To Pope's Reform Agenda

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 6:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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4:05pm

Wed June 17, 2015
Around the Nation

Red Crabs Invade Southern California Beaches In Search Of Warm Water

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 6:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There's something strange happening along the coast of Southern California. It's the latest in a string of rare phenomena that scientists link to unusually warm ocean waters. NPR's Kirk Siegler went to have a look.

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1:58pm

Wed June 17, 2015
Shots - Health News

Why Some Teen Brains May Be Hardwired To Make Risky Choices

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 11:45 am

Teenagers aren't exactly known for their responsible decision making.

But some young people are especially prone to making rash, risky decisions about sex, drugs and alcohol. Individual differences in the brain's working memory — which allows people to draw on and use information to make decisions — could help explain why some adolescents are especially impulsive when it comes to sex, according to a study published Wednesday in Child Development.

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1:50pm

Wed June 17, 2015
The Salt

To Tackle Food Waste, Big Grocery Chain Will Sell Produce Rejects

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 10:45 am

Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices.
Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

It's easy to blame someone else for food waste. If this is really a $2.6 trillion issue, as the United Nations estimates, then who's in charge of fixing it?

Turns out, we the eaters play a big role here.

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1:03pm

Wed June 17, 2015
The Two-Way

NASA Satellites Show World's Thirst For Groundwater

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 6:25 pm

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, or GRACE, used a pair of satellites to measure water use in the world's aquifers.
NASA

New data from NASA's GRACE satellites show that many of the world's biggest aquifers are being sucked dry at a rate far greater than they are being replenished. Although scientists don't know how much water is left, they hope their findings will serve as a "red flag" for regions that may be overusing water.

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8:43am

Wed June 17, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

After Long Slumber, Philae Says Hi To The World

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 9:17 am

An artist impression shows Philae on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
ESA/ATG medialab AP

In a technological feat that moved the world, last November the European Space Agency landed the small probe Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, which is cruising at some 100,000 miles per hour toward the sun. Excitement turned to high drama when the landing put the probe away from the sun's rays and, thus, from its energy source.

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9:35pm

Tue June 16, 2015
Shots - Health News

Updated Training Of Birth Control Counselors Boosts Use Of IUDs

When health care providers have the latest information on various birth control methods, research suggests, more of their patients who use birth control choose a long-acting reversible method, like the IUD.
iStockphoto

Just over half of all pregnancies in America are unplanned.

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