Science

4:34pm

Fri May 8, 2015
Environment

Global Carbon Dioxide Levels Reach Milestone

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 10:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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11:49am

Fri May 8, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Silencing Science

iStockphoto

Nikos Logothetis, a director at Germany's Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics and leading neuroscientist working on perception, has announced that he is ceasing research on primates.

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8:58pm

Thu May 7, 2015
Goats and Soda

Scientists Crack A 50-Year-Old Mystery About The Measles Vaccine

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 8:20 pm

Worth a little pain? Back in 1990, a school boy got a measles shot in the U.K., and it turns out, he got more than protection against the measles.
Photofusion UIG via Getty Images

Back in the 1960s, the U.S. started vaccinating kids for measles. As expected, children stopped getting measles.

But something else happened.

Childhood deaths from all infectious diseases plummeted. Even deaths from diseases like pneumonia and diarrhea were cut by half.

Scientists saw the same phenomenon when the vaccine came to England and parts of Europe. And they see it today when developing countries introduce the vaccine.

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6:09pm

Thu May 7, 2015
The Two-Way

A Fish With Cancer Raises Questions About Health Of Susquehanna River

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:24 pm

A smallmouth bass with confirmed malignant tumor was caught by an angler in the Susquehanna River near Duncannon, Pa., on Nov. 3, 2014.
John Arway Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission

Late last year, an angler caught a smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River near Duncannon, Pa. That fish, officials from the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission said this week, had a malignant tumor. It's the first time this type of tumor has been found on a smallmouth bass in the river, the agency says.

Cancerous growths and tumors on fish are "very, very infrequent," John Arway, the agency's executive director, said in an interview.

"These cancers can be initiated by contaminants," he said.

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5:19pm

Thu May 7, 2015
Around the Nation

California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 6:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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5:19pm

Thu May 7, 2015
Animals

At Long Last, Taxidermied Hyenas In Chicago Get Their Own Diorama

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:13 pm

After years tucked away in the Reptile Hall at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, four striped taxidermied hyenas are finally getting their own diorama.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:19pm

Thu May 7, 2015
Shots - Health News

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:21 pm

Cambrian Genomics says that what it calls a DNA printer is essentially a DNA sorter — it quickly spots and collects the desired, tailored stretch of DNA.
Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics

Here's something that might sound strange: There are companies now that print and sell DNA.

This trend — which uses the term "print" in the sense of making a bunch of copies speedily — is making particular stretches of DNA much cheaper and easier to obtain than ever before. That excites many scientists who are keen to use these tailored strings of genetic instructions to do all sorts of things, ranging from finding new medical treatments to genetically engineering better crops.

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8:28am

Thu May 7, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

France's 'New' Prehistoric Cave Art: The Real Thing?

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 12:02 pm

Drawings of animal figures in the life-size replica of Chauvet Cave in southern France.
Claude Paris AP

Starting around 35,000 years ago, our ancestors painted — with accurate lines and glorious colors — images of lions, bison, mammoth, rhinoceroses, horses and even an owl on the walls of what is now called Chauvet Cave in south-central France.

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8:17pm

Wed May 6, 2015
Shots - Health News

Fla. Governor Leaves Meeting With U.S. Health Secretary Empty-Handed

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 8:48 am

Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks Wednesday with reporters in Washington, D.C., after a meeting with Sylvia Burwell, head of the Department of Health and Human Services.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Florida Gov. Rick Scott paid a high-stakes visit to Washington D.C. on Wednesday, in hopes of persuading the Obama administration to continue a program that sends more than $1 billion in federal funds to Florida each year to help reimburse hospitals for the costs of caring for the state's poor. Uncertainty about the future of the program, slated to end June 30, has created a hole in the state budget and paralyzed Florida's legislature.

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5:45pm

Wed May 6, 2015
Shots - Health News

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:55 pm

Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea.
R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway

Scientists have discovered a group of microbes at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean that could provide new clues to how life went from being simple to complex.

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