Science

3:30pm

Thu January 23, 2014
Shots - Health News

Contagious Cancer In Dogs Leaves Prehistoric Paw Prints

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 12:36 pm

The sexually transmitted cancer is common in street dogs around the world.
Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Our four-legged friends suffer from many of the same cancers that we do. But one type of dog tumor acts like no other: It's contagious.

The tumor spreads from one pooch to another when the dogs have sex or even just touch or lick each other.

"It's a common disease in street dogs all around the world," says geneticist Elizabeth Murchison at the University of Cambridge. "People in the U.S. and U.K. haven't heard of it because it's found mostly in free-roaming dogs in developing countries."

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12:02pm

Thu January 23, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Return Of The Chicken Police

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:18 am

iStockphoto

A few days ago, a friend uploaded to her Facebook page a 30-second video she had found on the Internet. It starred two hens and two rabbits. Idly, I clicked on it:

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11:04am

Thu January 23, 2014
All Tech Considered

Weekly Innovation: A Radiation Detector In Your Smartphone

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 4:30 pm

Scientists tested their radiation detection app on four smartphones, concluding that it works well enough to be a useful warning system for first responders.
Idaho National Laboratory

In our Weekly Innovation series, we pick an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use our form.

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8:15pm

Wed January 22, 2014
Shots - Health News

A Growth Factor Heals The Damage To A Preemie's Brain — In Mice

A baby born too soon continues to develop and grow inside an incubator at the neonatal ward of the Centre Hospitalier de Lens in Lens, northern France.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

A naturally occurring substance called epidermal growth factor appears to reverse a type of brain damage that's common in very premature infants.

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4:36pm

Wed January 22, 2014
Shots - Health News

How A Little Chill In The Air Could Help You Lose Weight

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:11 am

Researchers say that setting your thermostat a little lower can help you burn more calories.
iStockphoto

When it comes to tackling obesity, eating right and staying active are usually the way to go. But a research team in the Netherlands says there's an environmental factor that might help and that is often overlooked: the cold.

We're not talking bone-chilling temperatures that'll make you shiver endlessly, but a milder cold between 62 and 77 degrees.

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3:01pm

Wed January 22, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Problem With A Clockwork Universe

iStockphoto

Last week I wrote about free will, or whether we are the agents of our own decisions. My thoughts were prompted by an invitation to participate in a roundtable discussion about the issue with colleagues from different fields, from cognitive neuroscience to philosophy, organized by the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi).

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3:44am

Wed January 22, 2014
Science

Ancient And Vulnerable: 25 Percent Of Sharks And Rays Risk Extinction

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 9:23 am

Each year, 6 to 8 percent of the global population of sharks and rays gets caught, scientists say. The fish can't reproduce fast enough to keep pace
Mike Johnston Flickr

There are more than a thousand species of sharks and rays in the world, and nearly a quarter of them are threatened with extinction, according to a new study. That means these ancient types of fish are among the most endangered animals in the world.

This word comes from a Swiss-based group called the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which maintains the so-called Red List of species threatened with extinction.

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6:26pm

Tue January 21, 2014
Science

After Hibernation, Rosetta Seeks Its Stone

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 2:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission is back in business. For the past 31 months, the spacecraft has effectively been asleep. Most of its instruments were shut off to save energy, including the radio for communicating with Earth. Mission managers can now start preparing Rosetta for a rendezvous with a comet later this year. NPR's Joe Palca has more.

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3:51pm

Tue January 21, 2014
The Salt

Whole Foods Bans Produce Grown With Sludge. But Who Wins?

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 6:55 pm

A woman shops in the produce section at Whole Foods in New York City. The company recently announced it would prohibit produce farmed using biosolids in its stores.
Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

If you've ever shopped at Whole Foods, you've probably noticed that some of the foods it sells claim all kinds of health and environmental virtues. From its lengthy list of unacceptable ingredients for food to its strict rules for how seafood is caught and meat is raised, the company sets a pretty high bar for what is permitted on its coveted shelves.

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2:00pm

Tue January 21, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Absurdity Of Consumerism

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 3:49 pm

iStockphoto

In his 2004 book Cloud Atlas, novelist David Mitchell imagines Nea So Copros, a dystopian future version of Seoul, Korea, in which consumer culture has become its own form of totalitarianism. It's a world where brands and logos become their own form of political power.

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