Science

5:34pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Environment

The Earth's 'Sixth Extinction' May Be One Of Our Own Making

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 10:15 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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5:34pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Science

Economist Says Best Climate Fix A Tough Sell, But Worth It

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 6:24 pm

The Climate Casino by William Nordhaus looks at the economics and politics of global warming.
Courtesy of Yale University Press

We often talk about climate change as a matter of science. But the biggest questions are really about money. How much would it cost to fix the problem — and what price will we pay if we don't?

The man who invented the field of climate economics 40 years ago says there's actually a straightforward way to solve the problem. William Nordhaus has written a book that lays it out in simple terms.

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2:07pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

You're The Last. The Very Last One. Now What Happens?

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:46 pm

John James Audubon University of Pittsburgh/ Wikimedia Commons

What happens if you are the last (the very, very last) of your species and you die — and humans notice?

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8:55am

Tue February 11, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

What Is Your Big Question?

iStockphoto

Questions ... questions ... So many big questions ...

Everybody has them. We are born cute but clueless, come of age through the ignominy of high school; shoulder the burden and joys of adulthood and then — BAM — it's over. And all around us is this space of infinite beauty and sorrow and weirdness. How can you not have questions?

Here at 13.7 we spend a lot of time on big questions. Here are a few that keep us up at night.

  • What is the nature of the mind?
  • Can there be a theory of everything?
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5:51pm

Mon February 10, 2014
Author Interviews

Sounds Intriguing: The World's Most Interesting Noises

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 3:55 pm

iStockphoto

Trevor Cox has heard it all. He's a professor of acoustic engineering at the University of Salford in England, and he delights in discovering unusual noises. He's also author of The Sound Book: The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World, which describes some of what he's found.

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5:51pm

Mon February 10, 2014
Animals

Official On Killed Giraffe: 'He Didn't Fit Into The Whole Puzzle'

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 3:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A coldly scientific decision to put down a giraffe at the Copenhagen Zoo has outraged animal lovers around the world. Yesterday, the zoo killed a young male giraffe named Marius, conducted a public autopsy and fed the carcass to the lions. The animal wasn't stricken by illness or injury. The intent was to prevent inbreeding. The animal's death caused an uproar on social media and among animal rights activists who say that there were ways to save its life.

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3:39pm

Mon February 10, 2014
The Salt

The Neuroscience Of Munchies: Why The Scent Of A Burger Gives Us A High

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 6:56 pm

Research in mice offers new clues as to why Harold and Kumar were so motivated to get to White Castle.
Todd Plitt/Getty Images

From cinnamon buns in the morning to a burger after a long run, food never smells as good as when you're superhungry.

Now scientists have uncovered a clue as to why that might be — and it lies in the munchies and marijuana.

Receptors in the brains of mice that light up when the animals are high are also activated when the critters are fasting, French scientists reported Sunday in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

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1:22pm

Mon February 10, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Dear Mr. Ham: You Can't Have It Both Ways

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 3:12 pm

How do you explain the dinosaur fossil record if the world is only 6,000 years old?
Bas Czerwinski AFP/Getty Images

Last Tuesday, Bill Nye "The Science Guy" faced off against Ken Ham of "Answers in Genesis" in a highly publicized debate about the following question:

Is creation a viable model of origins in today's modern, scientific era?

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12:49pm

Mon February 10, 2014
Shots - Health News

'Lung In A Box' Keeps Organs Breathing Before Transplants

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 8:57 am

The Organ Care System keeps lungs warm, breathing and nourished while outside the body.
MediCommConsultants

When doctors rush a lung to a hospital for a transplant, the precious cargo arrives in the operating room in a container that seems more appropriate for Bud Light — a cooler filled with ice.

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3:26am

Mon February 10, 2014
The Salt

It Takes More Than A Produce Aisle To Refresh A Food Desert

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 6:56 pm

Euclid Market, a corner store in East Los Angeles, recently got a makeover to promote healthier eating. It not only sells more fruits and vegetables, but also offers cooking classes and nutrition education.
Courtesy of Margaret Molloy/UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

In inner cities and poor rural areas across the country, public health advocates have been working hard to turn around food deserts — neighborhoods where fresh produce is scarce, and greasy fast food abounds. In many cases, they're converting dingy, cramped corner markets into lighter, brighter venues that offer fresh fruits and vegetables.

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