Science

1:20pm

Sun June 21, 2015
The Two-Way

'Speed,' Galápagos Tortoise Who Came To San Diego In 1933, Dies At 150

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 6:46 pm

This undated photo from the San Diego Zoo shows Speed, a Galapagos tortoise that has been at the zoo since 1933. The zoo reported Friday that Speed had been euthanized at an estimated age of more than 150 years.
AP

A rare Galápagos tortoise, known affectionately as "Speed," has died at the San Diego Zoo — his home of more than eight decades. He was (approximately) 150.

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9:43am

Sun June 21, 2015
Parallels

Israel Bets On Recycled Water To Meet Its Growing Thirst

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 10:20 pm

Farmer Efi Cohen inspects almond trees on a kibbutz south of Jerusalem. The Israeli government says it's safe to use treated sewage water to irrigate tree fruit, but not all crops.
Emily Harris NPR

Recycling sewage water has helped free Israel, a desert country, from depending on rain.

Treated sewage water provides close to a quarter of Israel's demand for water, right behind desalination, the other major process that has eased Israel's fear of drought.

But making that water — from toilets, showers, and factories — clean enough to use is challenging.

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7:03am

Sun June 21, 2015
Shots - Health News

Fitness App Aims To Deliver Live Feedback From A Personal Trainer 24/7

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 7:31 am

In the current version of the Fitnet App, the camera of an exerciser's smartphone captures data from him (upper left), while a prerecorded trainer guides him through a workout. A clock (bottom center) shows elapsed time. The orange dots (upper left) indicate he's following her routine well, as judged by the camera and phone's app. The app can also estimate the exerciser's number of steps.
Courtesy of FitNet

It would be easier to exercise, I've told myself, if I had a personal trainer. Maybe one that came to my house. Whenever I wanted. For free.

My dream of a live trainer who won't judge my outfit and is available at my beck and call — like a Jillian Michaels who knows my name — is being developed as an app called Fitnet.

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8:16am

Sat June 20, 2015
Animals

Volunteer Rangers Work To Rein In Antler Poachers

Originally published on Sat June 20, 2015 10:40 am

Troy Capps found deer antlers in central Oregon's backcountry. Capps is a co-founder of Oregon Shed Hunters, a group that promotes ethical shed hunting.
Courtney Flatt Northwest Public Radio

The trick to looking for antlers in the wild — if you're going about it ethically — is to keep your eyes to the ground.

"You're trying to just find something that looks out of the ordinary," Rob Tanner says.

Tanner and his brother-in-law Troy Capps are hiking around juniper trees and bitterbrush in the high-desert terrain of central Oregon. They're looking for antlers that were shed by deer or elk, otherwise known as shed hunting.

"It's just an adrenaline rush," Tanner says. "It's like, 'Oh, you know, this could be the one.' "

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5:36pm

Fri June 19, 2015
Energy

Proposed Oil Refinery Could Help Washington State Meet Clean Fuel Standards

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 8:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:31pm

Fri June 19, 2015
Shots - Health News

The Neighs Have It: Horse Outruns Man, But Just Barely

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 11:40 am

Horses, riders and runners crossed three streams in the course of their 22-mile race through the hills of central Wales. The average finish time was the same for both species — four hours.
Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole NPR's Skunk Bear

The Man v. Horse Marathon starts out like a typical cross-country race. Hundreds of runners stream past the starting line, through the town of Llanwrtyd Wells and then up into the Welsh hills.

But 15 minutes later, a second set of competitors takes off. Fifty horses and their riders chase the runners up and down ridges, across streams, and past hundreds of bewildered sheep.

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12:33pm

Fri June 19, 2015
Shots - Health News

Hunting Ways To Keep Synthetic Estrogens Out Of Rivers And Seas

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 1:26 pm

Removing micropollutants from wastewater isn't cheap or easy.
iStockphoto

Millions of women around the world take synthetic hormones via birth control pills or hormone replacement therapies. Not all of the estrogen-like compounds from these and other treatments are used by the body — small amounts are excreted and end up in municipal wastewater. And there's been no good way to completely remove these hormones before they head to rivers and seas.

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12:27pm

Fri June 19, 2015
The Two-Way

Administration Proposes New Truck Emissions Rules To Reduce CO2

Ram Trucks parade near AT&T Stadium in April. The EPA and Department of Transportation has proposed stricter emissions guidelines for medium and heavy-duty trucks.
PR NEWSWIRE

The Obama administration announced new rules today that would require tighter emissions guidelines for medium and heavy-duty trucks in an effort to reduce greenhouse gases.

The rules, proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), were expected to cut carbon dioxide emissions from trucks and vans by one-quarter by the year 2027.

The proposed standards affect semi-trucks, large pickup trucks and vans, buses and work trucks and cover model years 2021-2027, officials said.

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10:24am

Fri June 19, 2015
The Two-Way

'They Will Strafe You,' Bird Expert Says Of Seattle's Dive-Bombing Crows

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 11:02 am

A crow dives on a researcher during a trial. Crows recognize people who have scared them or wronged them for years afterward.
Courtesy of Keith Brust

It has become an annual process: Crows swoop down on unsuspecting Seattleites, who then call wildlife professor John Marzluff, who explains that it's simply the season for crows to dive-bomb people — and that they're mostly harmless.

The behavior, Marzluff tells member station KUOW, is tied to something many parents can understand: the empty nest.

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9:14am

Fri June 19, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Justice Scalia And The Age Of Humanity

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia speaking in Atlanta.
Dave Tulis AP

Earlier this month, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia delivered a commencement address to the graduating class of the Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart in Bethesda, Md.

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