Science

4:33pm

Wed July 22, 2015
Environment

Amid Stark Realities, How Do Climate Scientists 'Stay Positive?'

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 7:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

8:58am

Wed July 22, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Game Of Quarks: A Guide For The Perplexed

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 5:21 pm

iStockphoto

Nature is the ultimate puzzle player, as scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) found out last week.

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5:19pm

Tue July 21, 2015
Environment

A Strengthening El Nino Could Mean Wet Winter On The West Coast

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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4:21pm

Tue July 21, 2015
Shots - Health News

Women's Brains Appear More Vulnerable To Alzheimer's Than Men's

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:05 am

Women with mild cognitive impairment, which can be a precursor to Alzheimer's, tend to decline faster than men.
Lizzie Roberts Getty Images/Ikon Images

There's new evidence suggesting that women's brains are especially vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease and other problems with memory and thinking.

Women with mild cognitive impairment, which can lead to Alzheimer's, tend to decline faster than men, researchers reported this week at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington, D.C.

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3:45pm

Tue July 21, 2015
Shots - Health News

2 Gene Studies Suggest First Migrants To Americas A Complex Mix

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 2:42 pm

The area around the confluence of the Silverthrone and Klinaklini glaciers in southwestern British Columbia provides a glimpse into how the terrain traveled by Native Americans in Pleistocene times may have appeared.
David J. Meltzer/Science

The first people to set foot in the Americas apparently came from Siberia during the last ice age.

That's the conventional wisdom.

But now there's evidence from two different studies published this week that the first Americans may have migrated from different places at different times — and earlier than people thought.

The human race has walked or paddled or sailed until it covered the globe. Scientists can trace those migrations from the stuff these people left behind: tools, dwellings or burial grounds.

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12:39pm

Tue July 21, 2015
The Salt

A 3-D Food Lab And Restaurant Wants To Turn Yuck Into Yum

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 8:59 am

For 3-D food printers, chocolate is a good material to start with, because it's fairly simple to make it liquid inside the printer cartridge and solid once it drops out.
Courtesy of Smart Gastronomy Lab, University of Liège

Dorothée Goffin's lab in Belgium is outfitted with 3-D printers and digital milling machines. It's also a kitchen. And, one day a week, the doors open to anyone who feels like walking in to mess around with the equipment. These days, the tech geeks, chefs and curious folk that inhabit the lab are focused on 3-D printing. Instead of spouting plastic doodads, the printers exude chocolate.

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10:59am

Tue July 21, 2015
The Salt

Tea Sommeliers Are The Hot New Thing In Food Pairing

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 2:01 pm

Christopher Day, the dining room manager at Eleven Madison Park, is also the man behind its tea program. "My goal has always been to put together a tea list with the same standard and rigor as you would with wine," he says.
Kathy YL Chan for NPR

Even those of us who can't tell the difference between a pinot noir and a merlot are probably familiar with the basic rule of wine pairing: white wine with fish and red wine with steak. But when it comes to tea pairings, we're stumped.

Yet it turns out there is an art to unlocking new flavors in your food by pairing it with tea. Sipping oolong with a buttery, citrusy madeleine can highlight the flowery and milky notes of the tea, while a hot cup of green tea melts the texture of goat cheese and enhances its creamy notes.

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9:15am

Tue July 21, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Does Mindfulness Mean Anything?

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 1:00 pm

Emir Memedovski iStockphoto

We are in the middle of a mindfulness revolution.

According to Time, The Huffington Post and a host of other media outlets, mindfulness and meditation are having their moment in the spotlight. From hospitals to corporate wellness programs, mindfulness is — supposedly — a new path to relieving stress, lifting depression and increasing happiness.

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5:01am

Tue July 21, 2015
Shots - Health News

Expanding, Not Shrinking, Saves A Small Rural Hospital

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 10:03 am

One of the first signs drivers see on the way into Unionville, Mo. is this billboard advertising cardiology at Putnam County Memorial Hospital. Offering specialty services, like cardiology and psychiatry turned the hospital around, community leaders say.
Bram Sable-Smith/KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Missouri cattle farmer Greg Fleshman became so concerned about keeping his local hospital open that in 2011 he joined its governing board.

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6:09pm

Mon July 20, 2015
The Two-Way

Failed Strut Likely Caused SpaceX Rocket To Explode, Elon Musk Says

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 6:55 am

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft break apart shortly after liftoff from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on June 28. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said Monday the failure of a steel strut likely caused the rocket to explode.
John Raoux AP

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk says a steel strut is the most likely cause of last month's explosion of an unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

"The preliminary conclusion is that the failure arose from a strut in the second stage liquid oxygen tank," Musk said Monday at a news conference.

He said one of the steel struts that held a helium bottle broke free during flight, likely causing the bottle to shoot to the top of the tank at high speed.

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